3D imaging of archaeological tomb by electrical resistivity techniques

Hideki Mizunaga, Toshiaki Tanaka, Keisuke Ushijima

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Several geophysical exploration methods have been applied to the problem of detecting and mapping underground archaeological remains with practical success. The most productive techniques are those for which the archaeological target exhibits the great physical contrast with the surrounding formation. Most widely used in archaeological prospection include Magnetic, Electromagnetic, Ground Penetrating Radar and Electrical Resistivity methods applied at the shallow surface. However, these conventional geophysical measurements for an archaeological prospection has been tried with relatively limited success. Therefore, we have developed an automatic imaging system named as Handy-ARM (Archaeological Resistivity Meter) for an archaeologist based on electrical resistivity techniques.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication19th Symposium on the Application of Geophysics to Engineering and Environmental Problems, SAGEEP 2006: Geophysical Applications for Environmental and Engineering Hazzards - Advances and Constraints
Pages1374-1377
Number of pages4
Volume2
Publication statusPublished - 2006
Event19th Symposium on the Application of Geophysics to Engineering and Environmental Problems: Geophysical Applications for Environmental and Engineering Hazzards - Advances and Constraints, SAGEEP 2006 - Seattle, WA, United States
Duration: Apr 2 2006Apr 6 2006

Other

Other19th Symposium on the Application of Geophysics to Engineering and Environmental Problems: Geophysical Applications for Environmental and Engineering Hazzards - Advances and Constraints, SAGEEP 2006
CountryUnited States
CitySeattle, WA
Period4/2/064/6/06

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Geophysics
  • Environmental Engineering

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  • Cite this

    Mizunaga, H., Tanaka, T., & Ushijima, K. (2006). 3D imaging of archaeological tomb by electrical resistivity techniques. In 19th Symposium on the Application of Geophysics to Engineering and Environmental Problems, SAGEEP 2006: Geophysical Applications for Environmental and Engineering Hazzards - Advances and Constraints (Vol. 2, pp. 1374-1377)