A case of amebiasis with negative serologic markers that caused intra-abdominal abscess

Rie Tanaka, Norihiro Furusyo, Rinne Takeda, Shou Yamasaki, Akira Kusaga, Eiichi Ogawa, Murata Masayuki, Ryota Nakanishi, Yoshihiko Maehara

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

A 23-year-old Japanese woman presented with abdominal distention following fever, diarrhea, and abdominal pain during a stay in Taiwan. Serology for the detection of amebic-antibodies and stool microscopic examination were both negative. A computed tomography scan showed a 13 cm diameter abscess spreading from the lower abdominal wall to the pelvic retroperitoneal space. Needle aspiration of the abscess was done under computed tomography guidance, and microscopy of the aspirated fluid revealed trophozoites of Entamoeba. The patient was diagnosed as amebiasis with negative serologic markers that caused intra-abdominal abscess. Intravenous metronidazole treatment for two weeks did not result in any improvement of the abscess. After irrigation and drainage of the abscess, her symptoms resolved. This case report highlights that amebiasis should be considered when indicated by patient history, including travelers returning from endemic areas, and that further evaluation is necessary for diagnosis, even if the serology and stool test are negative.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)778-781
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Infection and Chemotherapy
Volume23
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 1 2017

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Abdominal Abscess
Amebiasis
Abscess
Serology
Tomography
Entamoeba
Retroperitoneal Space
Trophozoites
Metronidazole
Abdominal Wall
Taiwan
Abdominal Pain
Needles
Drainage
Microscopy
Diarrhea
Fever
Antibodies

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Pharmacology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

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A case of amebiasis with negative serologic markers that caused intra-abdominal abscess. / Tanaka, Rie; Furusyo, Norihiro; Takeda, Rinne; Yamasaki, Shou; Kusaga, Akira; Ogawa, Eiichi; Masayuki, Murata; Nakanishi, Ryota; Maehara, Yoshihiko.

In: Journal of Infection and Chemotherapy, Vol. 23, No. 11, 01.11.2017, p. 778-781.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tanaka, R, Furusyo, N, Takeda, R, Yamasaki, S, Kusaga, A, Ogawa, E, Masayuki, M, Nakanishi, R & Maehara, Y 2017, 'A case of amebiasis with negative serologic markers that caused intra-abdominal abscess', Journal of Infection and Chemotherapy, vol. 23, no. 11, pp. 778-781. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jiac.2017.04.010
Tanaka, Rie ; Furusyo, Norihiro ; Takeda, Rinne ; Yamasaki, Shou ; Kusaga, Akira ; Ogawa, Eiichi ; Masayuki, Murata ; Nakanishi, Ryota ; Maehara, Yoshihiko. / A case of amebiasis with negative serologic markers that caused intra-abdominal abscess. In: Journal of Infection and Chemotherapy. 2017 ; Vol. 23, No. 11. pp. 778-781.
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