A case study of cultural influences on mixing preference — Targeting Japanese Acoustic Major Students

Toshiki Tajima, Kazuhiko Kawahara

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

There is no clear rule in the process of mixing in popular music production, so even with the same music materials, different mix engineers may arrive at a completely different mix. In order to solve this highly multidimensional problem, some listening experiments of mixing preference have been conducted in Europe and North America in previous studies. In this study, additional experiments targeting Japanese major students in the field of acoustics were conducted in an acoustically treated listening room, and we integrated the data with previous ones and analyzed them together. The result showed a tendency for both British students and Japanese students to prefer (or dislike) the same engineers’ works. Furthermore, an analysis of verbal descriptions for mixing revealed that they gave most attention to similar listening points, such as “vocal,” and “reverb.”

Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2019
Event147th Audio Engineering Society International Convention 2019 - New York, United States
Duration: Oct 16 2019Oct 19 2019

Conference

Conference147th Audio Engineering Society International Convention 2019
CountryUnited States
CityNew York
Period10/16/1910/19/19

Fingerprint

students
Acoustics
music
Students
Music
engineers
acoustics
Engineers
rooms
Experiment
tendencies
Experiments
Influence

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Modelling and Simulation
  • Acoustics and Ultrasonics

Cite this

Tajima, T., & Kawahara, K. (2019). A case study of cultural influences on mixing preference — Targeting Japanese Acoustic Major Students. Paper presented at 147th Audio Engineering Society International Convention 2019, New York, United States.

A case study of cultural influences on mixing preference — Targeting Japanese Acoustic Major Students. / Tajima, Toshiki; Kawahara, Kazuhiko.

2019. Paper presented at 147th Audio Engineering Society International Convention 2019, New York, United States.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Tajima, T & Kawahara, K 2019, 'A case study of cultural influences on mixing preference — Targeting Japanese Acoustic Major Students', Paper presented at 147th Audio Engineering Society International Convention 2019, New York, United States, 10/16/19 - 10/19/19.
Tajima T, Kawahara K. A case study of cultural influences on mixing preference — Targeting Japanese Acoustic Major Students. 2019. Paper presented at 147th Audio Engineering Society International Convention 2019, New York, United States.
Tajima, Toshiki ; Kawahara, Kazuhiko. / A case study of cultural influences on mixing preference — Targeting Japanese Acoustic Major Students. Paper presented at 147th Audio Engineering Society International Convention 2019, New York, United States.
@conference{8a1a696ac42047dfa3fbca167d53c31c,
title = "A case study of cultural influences on mixing preference — Targeting Japanese Acoustic Major Students",
abstract = "There is no clear rule in the process of mixing in popular music production, so even with the same music materials, different mix engineers may arrive at a completely different mix. In order to solve this highly multidimensional problem, some listening experiments of mixing preference have been conducted in Europe and North America in previous studies. In this study, additional experiments targeting Japanese major students in the field of acoustics were conducted in an acoustically treated listening room, and we integrated the data with previous ones and analyzed them together. The result showed a tendency for both British students and Japanese students to prefer (or dislike) the same engineers’ works. Furthermore, an analysis of verbal descriptions for mixing revealed that they gave most attention to similar listening points, such as “vocal,” and “reverb.”",
author = "Toshiki Tajima and Kazuhiko Kawahara",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
language = "English",
note = "147th Audio Engineering Society International Convention 2019 ; Conference date: 16-10-2019 Through 19-10-2019",

}

TY - CONF

T1 - A case study of cultural influences on mixing preference — Targeting Japanese Acoustic Major Students

AU - Tajima, Toshiki

AU - Kawahara, Kazuhiko

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - There is no clear rule in the process of mixing in popular music production, so even with the same music materials, different mix engineers may arrive at a completely different mix. In order to solve this highly multidimensional problem, some listening experiments of mixing preference have been conducted in Europe and North America in previous studies. In this study, additional experiments targeting Japanese major students in the field of acoustics were conducted in an acoustically treated listening room, and we integrated the data with previous ones and analyzed them together. The result showed a tendency for both British students and Japanese students to prefer (or dislike) the same engineers’ works. Furthermore, an analysis of verbal descriptions for mixing revealed that they gave most attention to similar listening points, such as “vocal,” and “reverb.”

AB - There is no clear rule in the process of mixing in popular music production, so even with the same music materials, different mix engineers may arrive at a completely different mix. In order to solve this highly multidimensional problem, some listening experiments of mixing preference have been conducted in Europe and North America in previous studies. In this study, additional experiments targeting Japanese major students in the field of acoustics were conducted in an acoustically treated listening room, and we integrated the data with previous ones and analyzed them together. The result showed a tendency for both British students and Japanese students to prefer (or dislike) the same engineers’ works. Furthermore, an analysis of verbal descriptions for mixing revealed that they gave most attention to similar listening points, such as “vocal,” and “reverb.”

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85075782591&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85075782591&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Paper

AN - SCOPUS:85075782591

ER -