A consideration on size and area-to-mass distributions for breakup fragments

H. Hata, Toshiya Hanada, T. Yasaka, Y. Akahoshi, S. Harada

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The objective of this paper is to examine the applicability of the hypervelocity collision model adopted in the NASA standard breakup model 2000 revision to low-velocity impact on spacecraft. Therefore, we performed some impact test at a velocity range less than 1.5 km/s. A target impacted was a aluminum honeycomb sandwich panel with CFRP face sheets, while a projectile launched was a aluminum solid sphere. We compared the data from those impact tests with the hypervelocity collision model. From this comparison, we have found that a lower boundary exists on area-to-mass distribution to explain the disagreement between the data and the hypervelocity collision model. We also proposed two different fashions to modify size distribution. Finally, this paper will conclude that the hypervelocity collision model can be applied to low-velocity impact on spacecraft with the above-introduced modifications.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationInternational Astronautical Federation - 55th International Astronautical Congress 2004
Pages3808-3816
Number of pages9
Volume6
Publication statusPublished - 2004
EventInternational Astronautical Federation - 55th International Astronautical Congress 2004 - Vancouver, Canada
Duration: Oct 4 2004Oct 8 2004

Other

OtherInternational Astronautical Federation - 55th International Astronautical Congress 2004
CountryCanada
CityVancouver
Period10/4/0410/8/04

Fingerprint

hypervelocity
mass distribution
fragments
collision
impact tests
collisions
low speed
Spacecraft
spacecraft
aluminum
spacecraft breakup
Aluminum
carbon fiber reinforced plastics
Carbon fiber reinforced plastics
Projectiles
NASA
projectiles
distribution
test

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Aerospace Engineering
  • Space and Planetary Science

Cite this

Hata, H., Hanada, T., Yasaka, T., Akahoshi, Y., & Harada, S. (2004). A consideration on size and area-to-mass distributions for breakup fragments. In International Astronautical Federation - 55th International Astronautical Congress 2004 (Vol. 6, pp. 3808-3816)

A consideration on size and area-to-mass distributions for breakup fragments. / Hata, H.; Hanada, Toshiya; Yasaka, T.; Akahoshi, Y.; Harada, S.

International Astronautical Federation - 55th International Astronautical Congress 2004. Vol. 6 2004. p. 3808-3816.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Hata, H, Hanada, T, Yasaka, T, Akahoshi, Y & Harada, S 2004, A consideration on size and area-to-mass distributions for breakup fragments. in International Astronautical Federation - 55th International Astronautical Congress 2004. vol. 6, pp. 3808-3816, International Astronautical Federation - 55th International Astronautical Congress 2004, Vancouver, Canada, 10/4/04.
Hata H, Hanada T, Yasaka T, Akahoshi Y, Harada S. A consideration on size and area-to-mass distributions for breakup fragments. In International Astronautical Federation - 55th International Astronautical Congress 2004. Vol. 6. 2004. p. 3808-3816
Hata, H. ; Hanada, Toshiya ; Yasaka, T. ; Akahoshi, Y. ; Harada, S. / A consideration on size and area-to-mass distributions for breakup fragments. International Astronautical Federation - 55th International Astronautical Congress 2004. Vol. 6 2004. pp. 3808-3816
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