A low ankle brachial index is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease: The hisayama study

Iwao Kojima, Toshiharu Ninomiya, Jun Hata, Masayo Fukuhara, Yoichiro Hirakawa, Naoko Mukai, Daigo Yoshida, Takanari Kitazono, Yutaka Kiyohara

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Results: During the follow-up period, 134 subjects experienced cardiovascular events. The incidence of cardiovascular disease across the ABI values was significantly different (p<0.001). After adjusting for confounding factors, namely age, sex, systolic blood pressure, use of anti-hypertensive drugs, diabetes, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, obesity, smoking, alcohol intake and regular exercise, individuals with a low ABI were at 2.40-fold (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.14-5.06) greater risk of cardiovascular disease and 4.13-fold (95% CI 1.62-10.55) greater risk of coronary heart disease.

Conclusions: Our findings suggest that individuals with an ABI of ≤ 0.90 have an increased risk of cardiovascular events, independent from traditional risk factors, in the general Japanese population.

Aim: Peripheral artery disease (PAD), defined as a decreased ankle brachial index (ABI), is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease; however, few studies have assessed the relationship between a low ABI and cardiovascular risks in Asian populations. We herein examined the relationship between the ABI and the development of cardiovascular disease in a Japanese community.

Methods: A total of 2,954 community-dwelling Japanese individuals without prior cardiovascular disease ≥ 40 years of age were followed up for an average of 7.1 years. The subjects’ ABIs were categorized into the three groups: low (≤ 0.90), borderline (0.91-0.99) and normal (1.00-1.40). We estimated the relationship between the ABI and cardiovascular risk using a Cox proportional hazards model.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)966-973
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of atherosclerosis and thrombosis
Volume21
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2014

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Ankle Brachial Index
Cardiovascular Diseases
Confidence Intervals
Blood Pressure
Independent Living
Age Factors
Peripheral Arterial Disease
Cholesterol
Blood pressure
Medical problems
Proportional Hazards Models
HDL Cholesterol
Antihypertensive Agents
Population
Coronary Disease
Hazards
Obesity
Smoking
Alcohols
Exercise

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Internal Medicine
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Biochemistry, medical

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A low ankle brachial index is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease : The hisayama study. / Kojima, Iwao; Ninomiya, Toshiharu; Hata, Jun; Fukuhara, Masayo; Hirakawa, Yoichiro; Mukai, Naoko; Yoshida, Daigo; Kitazono, Takanari; Kiyohara, Yutaka.

In: Journal of atherosclerosis and thrombosis, Vol. 21, No. 9, 01.01.2014, p. 966-973.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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