A Multicenter, Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial to Investigate the Effects of Kamishoyosan, a Traditional Japanese Medicine, on Menopausal Symptoms: The KOSMOS Study

Kiyoshi Takamatsu, Mariko Ogawa, Satoshi Obayashi, Takashi Takeda, Masakazu Terauchi, Tsuyoshi Higuchi, Kiyoko Kato, Toshiro Kubota

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective. The KOSMOS study, a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, investigated the effects and safety of kamishoyosan (TJ-24), a traditional Japanese medicine, in the treatment of climacteric disorder. Methods. Japanese women with climacteric disorder were administered a placebo during a 4-week run-in period, after which they were classified as placebo responders (R group) if their score on the modified Questionnaire for the Assessment of Climacteric Symptoms in Japanese Women (m-QACS) with excitability and irritability as the primary outcome improved by ≥ 3 points and as placebo nonresponders (NR group) otherwise. Members of the NR group were randomly allocated to receive either TJ-24 or placebo. After 12 weeks, their m-QACS scores, anxiety and depression, sleep, and overall quality of life (QOL) were compared. Results. The TJ-24 and placebo arms in the NR group included 20 patients each. The change in the m-QACS scores of members of the NR group for excitability and irritability at 12 weeks versus baseline was -3.1 ± 1.7 in the TJ-24 arm, a significant decrease, but compared with -2.7 ± 2.2 in the placebo arm, no significant difference was between two arms. However, the proportion of participants whose score improved by ≥3 points was significantly higher in the TJ-24 arm. In the subgroup analysis of premenopausal women, the changes in the score for excitability and irritability were significantly larger in the TJ-24 arm. The incidence of adverse drug reactions or adverse events did not differ between the two arms, and no serious events were reported. Conclusion. Although no significant difference was identified for the primary outcome, a significantly higher proportion of patients who received TJ-24 displayed improvement. Its high level of safety and effects on excitability and irritability in premenopausal women suggest that TJ-24 may be a useful treatment.

Original languageEnglish
Article number8856149
JournalEvidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume2021
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Complementary and alternative medicine

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