A review of the research on introduced freshwater fishes: New perspectives, the need for research, and management implications

Mayumi Sato, Yôichi Kawaguchi, Jun Nakajima, Takahiko Mukai, Yukihiro Shimatani, Norio Onikura

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although freshwater fishes have a long history of human-induced introduction, recent globalization has accelerated worldwide introduction events even more, and those introduced fish species are now perceived to be a major threat to ecosystems. Over the last two decades, numerous studies have been published on introduced fish species; however, it has been challenging for researchers to understand the magnitude of the impact and the underlying mechanism of invasions. Recently, new perspectives in understanding invasive freshwater fish biology have been presented in a number of studies, which can be largely attributed to advances in analytical techniques and also to a growing need for proactive analysis in management strategies. The aim of this paper is to summarize new ecological perspectives, the need for research, and/or management implications with emphasis on technological advances in, for example, statistics, molecular analysis, modeling techniques, and landscape analysis addressed under the following five categories: introduction pathways, predicting spatial patterns, biotic homogenization, hybridization, and control and eradication. The conservation of native fish fauna and the management of introduced fish species will benefit from combining these new perspectives with fundamental studies such as those on life history and population biology.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)99-108
Number of pages10
JournalLandscape and Ecological Engineering
Volume6
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2010

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fish
fish biology
molecular analysis
globalization
analytical method
life history
need
fauna
ecosystem
history
modeling
analysis
statistics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ecology
  • Nature and Landscape Conservation
  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law

Cite this

A review of the research on introduced freshwater fishes : New perspectives, the need for research, and management implications. / Sato, Mayumi; Kawaguchi, Yôichi; Nakajima, Jun; Mukai, Takahiko; Shimatani, Yukihiro; Onikura, Norio.

In: Landscape and Ecological Engineering, Vol. 6, No. 1, 01.01.2010, p. 99-108.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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