A single-item global job satisfaction measure is associated with quantitative blood immune indices in white-collar employees

Akinori Nakata, Masahiro Irie, Masaya Takahashi

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    9 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Although a single-item job satisfaction measure has been shown to be reliable and inclusive as multiple-item scales in relation to health, studies including immunological data are few. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the validity of single-item job and family life satisfaction based on its association with immune indices. A total of 189 white-collar employees (70% men) underwent a blood draw for the measurement of natural killer (NK), total T, and B cell counts as well as plasma immunoglobulin (Ig) G concentrations and completed single-item job and family life satisfaction measures, respectively. The response options for satisfaction measures were 'dissatisfied' (coded 1) to 'satisfied' (coded 4). Spearman's partial correlations controlling for cofactors revealed that increased job satisfaction was positively associated with NK cells (rsp=0.201, p=0.007) and IgG (rsp=0.A78, p=0.018), while family life satisfaction was unrelated to immune indices. Those who reported a combination of low job/low family life satisfaction had significantly lower NK and higher B cell counts than those with a high job/high family life satisfaction. Our study suggests that the single-item summary measure of job satisfaction, but not family life satisfaction, may be a valid tool to evaluate immune status in healthy white-collar employees.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)193-201
    Number of pages9
    JournalIndustrial health
    Volume51
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Mar 2013

    All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

    • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
    • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

    Fingerprint

    Dive into the research topics of 'A single-item global job satisfaction measure is associated with quantitative blood immune indices in white-collar employees'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this