A study on accelerated motion and circling movement of fish based on image analysis

Satoru Yamaguchi, Masashi Terada

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

The shape and swimming method of fish vary in accordance with their environment and fish have high maneuverability in water. It is believed that studies on how fish swim can suggest a new effective propulsion method for underwater vehicles and robots, and that various types of fish type robots using new propulsion methods may contribute to ocean observations, developments and environmental protection. A great deal of research on hydrodynamic performance of fish swimming in a steady state that includes turning and positioning by fins has been carried out (Kumph, 1998; Anderson, 1998), but examination of transient motions such as accelerated motion, stopping motion and unsteady circling movement remains insufficient.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the International Offshore and Polar Engineering Conference
Pages571-575
Number of pages5
Publication statusPublished - Dec 1 2005
Event15th International Offrshore and Polar Engineering Conference, ISOPE-2005 - Seoul, Korea, Republic of
Duration: Jun 19 2005Jun 24 2005

Publication series

NameProceedings of the International Offshore and Polar Engineering Conference
Volume2005
ISSN (Print)1098-6189
ISSN (Electronic)1555-1792

Other

Other15th International Offrshore and Polar Engineering Conference, ISOPE-2005
CountryKorea, Republic of
CitySeoul
Period6/19/056/24/05

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All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Energy Engineering and Power Technology
  • Ocean Engineering
  • Mechanical Engineering

Cite this

Yamaguchi, S., & Terada, M. (2005). A study on accelerated motion and circling movement of fish based on image analysis. In Proceedings of the International Offshore and Polar Engineering Conference (pp. 571-575). (Proceedings of the International Offshore and Polar Engineering Conference; Vol. 2005).