A vacuolar-type H+-ATPase in a nonvacuolar organelle is required for the sorting of soluble vacuolar protein precursors in tobacco cells

Ken Matsuoka, Tatsuji Higuchi, Masayoshi Maeshima, Kenzo Nakamura

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

105 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In plant cells, vacuolar matrix proteins are separated from the secretory proteins at the Golgi complex for transport to the vacuoles. To investigate the involvement of vacuolar-type ATPase (V-ATPase) in the vacuolar targeting of soluble proteins, we analyzed the effects of bafilomycin A1 and concanamycin A on the transport of vacuolar protein precursors in tobacco cells. Low concentrations of these inhibitors caused the missorting of several vacuolar protein precursors; sorting was more sensitive to concanamycin A than to bafilomycin A1. Secretion of soluble proteins from tobacco cells was also inhibited by bafilomycin A1 and concanamycin A. We next analyzed the subcellular localization of V-ATPase. V-ATPase was found in a wide variety of endomembrane organelles. Both ATPase activity and ATP-dependent proton-pumping activity in the Golgi-enriched fraction were more sensitive to concanamycin A than to bafilomycin A1, whereas these activities in the tonoplast fraction were almost equally sensitive to both reagents. Our observations indicate that the V-ATPase in the organelle that was recovered in the Golgi-enriched fraction is required for the transport of vacuolar protein precursors and that this V-ATPase is distinguishable from the tonoplast-associated V-ATPase.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)533-546
Number of pages14
JournalPlant Cell
Volume9
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 1997

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Plant Science
  • Cell Biology

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