Abdominal esophageal banding for esophageal atresia with tracheoesophageal fistula in neonates with severe associated anomalies

Atsuhisa Fukuta, Tetsuro Kamimura, Wataru Furuno, Junko Yamamoto, Chie Yokota, Syunya Omura

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the materials used for abdominal esophageal banding, and to evaluate the complications associated with abdominal esophageal banding. Methods: The medical records of seven patients with esophageal atresia (EA) and tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF) who underwent abdominal esophageal banding between December 2009 and January 2020 were retrospectively reviewed. Results: The patients were banded with vinyl tape (n = 1), silicone tape (n = 2), polyacetal resin clips (n = 1), or an expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) sheet (n = 3). Banding with vinyl tape resulted in banding failure at postoperative day (POD) 89. One patient with silicone tape developed banding failure at POD 177. In the other patient, it was discovered during radical surgery that the silicone tape had slipped through the abdominal esophagus. Polyacetal resin clip banding resulted in esophageal wall perforation at POD 27. One patient banded with an ePTFE sheet underwent upper gastric transection at POD 650, while another underwent TEF resection at POD 156; in the third patient, the banding condition was maintained for more than 100 days. Conclusion: Abdominal esophageal banding is useful as a palliative treatment for EA/TEF with severe associated anomalies. Surgeons should plan the next surgery depending on the patient’s condition.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)261-266
Number of pages6
JournalPediatric surgery international
Volume37
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2021
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Surgery

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