Accumulation of prion protein in muscle fibers of experimental chloroquine myopathy: In vivo model for deposition of prion protein in non-neuronal tissues

Hisako Furukawa, Katsumi Doh-Ura, Kensuke Sasaki, Toru Iwaki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Prion protein (PrP) is known to accumulate in some non-neuronal tissues under conditions unrelated to prion diseases. The biochemical and biological nature of such accumulated PrP molecules, however, has not been fully evaluated. In this study, we established experimental myopathy in hamsters by long-term administration of chloroquine, and we examined the nature of the PrP molecules that accumulated. PrP accumulation was immunohistochemically demonstrated in autophagic vacuoles in degenerated muscle fibers, and this was accompanied by the accumulation of other molecules related to the neuropathogenesis of prion diseases such as clathrin, cathepsin B, heparan sulfate, and apolipoprotein J. Accumulated PrP molecules were partially insoluble in detergent solution and were slightly less sensitive to proteinase K digestion than normal cellular PrP. Muscle homogenates containing these PrP molecules did not cause disease in inoculated hamsters. The findings indicate that the PrP molecules that accumulated in muscle fibers have distinct biochemical and biological properties. Therefore, experimental chloroquine myopathy is a novel and useful model to investigate the mechanism of deposition of PrP in non-neuronal tissues and might provide new insights in the pathogenesis of prion diseases.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)828-835
Number of pages8
JournalLaboratory Investigation
Volume84
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2004

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Molecular Biology
  • Cell Biology

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