Aclarubicin induces differentiation of leukemic progenitors in myelodysplastic syndrome cooperating with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor

Koichi Akashi, Tetsuya Eto, Tsunefumi Shibuya, Kazuya Shimoda, Mine Harada, Yoshiyuki Niho

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We have reported that low-dose aclarubicin (ACR) therapy is effective in some patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Here, we demonstrate that a low concentration of ACR induces the in vitro differentiation of leukemic progenitor cells from patients with MDS. ACR (0.1 ng/ml) significantly increased the number of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF)-dependent colonies from circulating blast cells in vitro in six out of seven MDS patients with refractory anemia with excess of blast in transformation or chronic myelomonocytic leukemia, but not in all four patients with primary acute myelogenous leukemia. In these MDS patients, the effect of ACR gradually disappeared along with the progression of MDS. Interestingly, the majority of G-CSF/ACR-dependent colonies consisted of rather differentiated myeloid cells such as myelocytes and metamyelocytes, whereas colonies formed by G-CSF alone were composed mainly of immature blastic cells. The number of G-CSF-responding progenitors significantly increased during a 24-48 h incubation with ACR alone. The circulating blasts in MDS patients expressed G-CSF receptors at unchanged levels before and after the incubation with ACR. It is suggested that ACR might increase clonogenic progenitor responsiveness to G-CSF in MDS, probably through modulating downstream signaling cascades associated with G-CSF receptors, and induce these progenitors to differentiate in response to G-CSF. Copyright (C) 2000 Elsevier Science Ltd.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)243-248
Number of pages6
JournalLeukemia Research
Volume24
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 1 2000

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Hematology
  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Aclarubicin induces differentiation of leukemic progenitors in myelodysplastic syndrome cooperating with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this