ACP2P: Agent community based peer-to-peer information retrieval

Tsunenori Mine, Daisuke Matsuno, Akihiro Kogo, Makoto Amamiya

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper proposes an agent community based information retrieval method, which uses agent communities to manage and look up information related to users. An agent works as a delegate of its user and searches for information that the user wants by communicating with other agents. The communication between agents is carried out in a peer-to-peer computing architecture. In order to retrieve information relevant to a user query, an agent uses two histories: a query/retrieved document history(Q/RDH) and a query/sender agent history(Q/SAH). The former is a list of pairs of a query and retrieved document information, where the queries were sent by the agent itself. The latter is a list of pairs of a query and the address of a sender agent and shows "who sent what query to the agent". This is useful for finding a new information source. Making use of the Q/SAH is expected to have a collaborative filtering effect, which gradually creates virtual agent communities, where agents with the same interests stay together. Our hypothesis is that a virtual agent community reduces communication loads involved in performing a search. As an agent receives more queries, then more links to new knowledge are acquired. From this behavior, a "give and take" (or positive feedback) effect for agents seems to emerge. We implemented this method with Multi-Agent Kodama, and conducted experiments to test the hypothesis. The empirical results showed that the method was much more efficient than a naive method employing 'multicast' techniques only to look up a target agent.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationLecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)
Pages62-73
Number of pages12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 1 2005
EventThird International Workshop on Agents and Peer-to-Peer Computing, AP2PC 2004 - New York, NY, United States
Duration: Jul 19 2004Jul 19 2004

Publication series

NameLecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)
Volume3601 LNAI
ISSN (Print)0302-9743
ISSN (Electronic)1611-3349

Other

OtherThird International Workshop on Agents and Peer-to-Peer Computing, AP2PC 2004
CountryUnited States
CityNew York, NY
Period7/19/047/19/04

Fingerprint

Peer to Peer
Information retrieval
Information Retrieval
Query
Virtual Agents
Community
Peer-to-peer Computing
Collaborative filtering
Communication
Positive Feedback
Collaborative Filtering
Multicast

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Theoretical Computer Science
  • Computer Science(all)

Cite this

Mine, T., Matsuno, D., Kogo, A., & Amamiya, M. (2005). ACP2P: Agent community based peer-to-peer information retrieval. In Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics) (pp. 62-73). (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics); Vol. 3601 LNAI). https://doi.org/10.1007/11574781_6

ACP2P : Agent community based peer-to-peer information retrieval. / Mine, Tsunenori; Matsuno, Daisuke; Kogo, Akihiro; Amamiya, Makoto.

Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics). 2005. p. 62-73 (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics); Vol. 3601 LNAI).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Mine, T, Matsuno, D, Kogo, A & Amamiya, M 2005, ACP2P: Agent community based peer-to-peer information retrieval. in Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics). Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics), vol. 3601 LNAI, pp. 62-73, Third International Workshop on Agents and Peer-to-Peer Computing, AP2PC 2004, New York, NY, United States, 7/19/04. https://doi.org/10.1007/11574781_6
Mine T, Matsuno D, Kogo A, Amamiya M. ACP2P: Agent community based peer-to-peer information retrieval. In Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics). 2005. p. 62-73. (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)). https://doi.org/10.1007/11574781_6
Mine, Tsunenori ; Matsuno, Daisuke ; Kogo, Akihiro ; Amamiya, Makoto. / ACP2P : Agent community based peer-to-peer information retrieval. Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics). 2005. pp. 62-73 (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)).
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