Adsorption of inflammatory cytokines using a heparin-coated extracorporeal circuit

Masanori Fujita, Masayuki Ishihara, Katsuaki Ono, Hidemi Hattori, Akira Kurita, Masafumi Shimizu, Atsuhiro Mitsumaru, Daisuke Segawa, Kazuhiro Hinokiyama, Yoshimasa Kusama, Makoto Kikuchi, Tadaaki Maehara

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) surgeries cause an increase in plasma inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) along with whole-body inflammatory responses. The inflammatory responses during a CPB treatment are reduced when using a heparin-coated extracorporeal circuit. Because many cytokines, growth factors, and complements are known to interact with heparin, the reduction of inflammatory responses by a heparin-coated circuit is likely to depend on this heparin-binding nature of the inflammatory cytokines. In this study, the inflammatory cytokines, TNF-α and IL-6, in fetal bovine serum (FBS) bound to a heparin-agarose beads (heparin beads)-column and the adsorptions were competitively inhibited on addition of heparin in a concentration-dependent manner. TNF-α in FBS required a higher concentration of heparin (50% concentration inhibition [IC50] > 20μg/ml) to inhibit adsorption to the heparin beads-column compared with IL-6, probably because of a stronger interaction between TNF-α and heparin-beads. TNF-α and IL-6 concentrations in human heparinized blood significantly increased after a CPB treatment. Although the adsorbed amount of IL-6 onto the heparin-coated circuit was low (less than 6% of free circulating IL-6), a significant amount of TNF-α adsorbed onto the circuit (23.9-755% of free circulating TNF-α). Therefore, the adsorption of inflammatory cytokines, especially TNF-α, onto the inner heparin-coated surface of an extracorporeal circuit may partly account for a reduction in inflammatory responses.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1020-1025
Number of pages6
JournalArtificial Organs
Volume26
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 1 2002

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Adsorption
Heparin
Cytokines
Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha
Interleukin-6
Cardiopulmonary Bypass
Serum
Surgery
Inhibitory Concentration 50
Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins
Blood
Plasmas

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Bioengineering
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Biomaterials
  • Biomedical Engineering

Cite this

Fujita, M., Ishihara, M., Ono, K., Hattori, H., Kurita, A., Shimizu, M., ... Maehara, T. (2002). Adsorption of inflammatory cytokines using a heparin-coated extracorporeal circuit. Artificial Organs, 26(12), 1020-1025. https://doi.org/10.1046/j.1525-1594.2002.07017.x

Adsorption of inflammatory cytokines using a heparin-coated extracorporeal circuit. / Fujita, Masanori; Ishihara, Masayuki; Ono, Katsuaki; Hattori, Hidemi; Kurita, Akira; Shimizu, Masafumi; Mitsumaru, Atsuhiro; Segawa, Daisuke; Hinokiyama, Kazuhiro; Kusama, Yoshimasa; Kikuchi, Makoto; Maehara, Tadaaki.

In: Artificial Organs, Vol. 26, No. 12, 01.12.2002, p. 1020-1025.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fujita, M, Ishihara, M, Ono, K, Hattori, H, Kurita, A, Shimizu, M, Mitsumaru, A, Segawa, D, Hinokiyama, K, Kusama, Y, Kikuchi, M & Maehara, T 2002, 'Adsorption of inflammatory cytokines using a heparin-coated extracorporeal circuit', Artificial Organs, vol. 26, no. 12, pp. 1020-1025. https://doi.org/10.1046/j.1525-1594.2002.07017.x
Fujita M, Ishihara M, Ono K, Hattori H, Kurita A, Shimizu M et al. Adsorption of inflammatory cytokines using a heparin-coated extracorporeal circuit. Artificial Organs. 2002 Dec 1;26(12):1020-1025. https://doi.org/10.1046/j.1525-1594.2002.07017.x
Fujita, Masanori ; Ishihara, Masayuki ; Ono, Katsuaki ; Hattori, Hidemi ; Kurita, Akira ; Shimizu, Masafumi ; Mitsumaru, Atsuhiro ; Segawa, Daisuke ; Hinokiyama, Kazuhiro ; Kusama, Yoshimasa ; Kikuchi, Makoto ; Maehara, Tadaaki. / Adsorption of inflammatory cytokines using a heparin-coated extracorporeal circuit. In: Artificial Organs. 2002 ; Vol. 26, No. 12. pp. 1020-1025.
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