Advances in microfluidics for lipid nanoparticles and extracellular vesicles and applications in drug delivery systems

Masatoshi Maeki, Niko Kimura, Yusuke Sato, Hideyoshi Harashima, Manabu Tokeshi

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

133 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Lipid-based nanobiomaterials as liposomes and lipid nanoparticles (LNPs) are the most widely used nanocarriers for drug delivery systems (DDSs). Extracellular vesicles (EVs) and exosomes are also expected to be applied as DDS nanocarriers. The performance of nanomedicines relies on their components such as lipids, targeting ligands, encapsulated DNA, encapsulated RNA, and drugs. Recently, the importance of the nanocarrier sizes smaller than 100 nm is attracting attention as a means to improve nanomedicine performance. Microfluidics and lab-on-a chip technologies make it possible to produce size-controlled LNPs by a simple continuous flow process and to separate EVs from blood samples by using a surface marker, ligand, or electric charge or by making a mass or particle size discrimination. Here, we overview recent advances in microfluidic devices and techniques for liposomes, LNPs, and EVs and their applications for DDSs.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)84-100
Number of pages17
JournalAdvanced Drug Delivery Reviews
Volume128
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 15 2018
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pharmaceutical Science

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