Advantage of dichromats over trichromats in discrimination of color-camouflaged stimuli in nonhuman primates

Atsuko Saito, Akichika Mikami, Shoji Kawamura, Yoshikazu Ueno, Chihiro Hiramatsu, Kanthi A. Widayati, Bambang Suryobroto, Migaku Teramoto, Yusuke Mori, Kunitoshi Nagano, Kazuo Fujita, Hika Kuroshima, Toshikazu Hasegawa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

54 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Due to a middle- to long-wavelength-sensitive (M/LWS) cone opsin polymorphism, there is considerable phenotypic variation in the color vision of New World monkeys. Many females have trichromatic vision, whereas some females and all males have dichromatic vision. The selective pressures that maintain this polymorphism are unclear. In the present study we compared the performance of dichromats and trichromats in a discrimination task. We examined tri- and dichromatic individuals of two species: brown capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella) and long-tailed macaques (Macaca fascicularis). We also examined one protanomalous chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes). The subjects' task was to discriminate a circular pattern from other patterns in which textural elements differed in orientation and thickness from the background. After they were trained with stimuli of a single color, the subjects were presented with color-camouflaged stimuli with a green/red mosaic overlaid onto the pattern. The dichromatic monkeys and the protanomalous chimpanzee selected the correct stimulus under camouflaged conditions at rates significantly above chance levels, while the trichromats did not. These findings demonstrate that dichromatic nonhuman primates possess a superior visual ability to discriminate color-camouflaged stimuli, and that such an ability may confer selective advantages with respect to the detection of cryptic foods and/or predators.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)425-436
Number of pages12
JournalAmerican Journal of Primatology
Volume67
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 1 2005
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Pan troglodytes
primate
Primates
Cebus
color
genetic polymorphism
opsin
Cebidae
color vision
polymorphism
cones (retina)
Macaca fascicularis
Macaca
phenotypic variation
monkeys
wavelengths
predators
predator
wavelength
food

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Animal Science and Zoology

Cite this

Advantage of dichromats over trichromats in discrimination of color-camouflaged stimuli in nonhuman primates. / Saito, Atsuko; Mikami, Akichika; Kawamura, Shoji; Ueno, Yoshikazu; Hiramatsu, Chihiro; Widayati, Kanthi A.; Suryobroto, Bambang; Teramoto, Migaku; Mori, Yusuke; Nagano, Kunitoshi; Fujita, Kazuo; Kuroshima, Hika; Hasegawa, Toshikazu.

In: American Journal of Primatology, Vol. 67, No. 4, 01.12.2005, p. 425-436.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Saito, A, Mikami, A, Kawamura, S, Ueno, Y, Hiramatsu, C, Widayati, KA, Suryobroto, B, Teramoto, M, Mori, Y, Nagano, K, Fujita, K, Kuroshima, H & Hasegawa, T 2005, 'Advantage of dichromats over trichromats in discrimination of color-camouflaged stimuli in nonhuman primates', American Journal of Primatology, vol. 67, no. 4, pp. 425-436. https://doi.org/10.1002/ajp.20197
Saito, Atsuko ; Mikami, Akichika ; Kawamura, Shoji ; Ueno, Yoshikazu ; Hiramatsu, Chihiro ; Widayati, Kanthi A. ; Suryobroto, Bambang ; Teramoto, Migaku ; Mori, Yusuke ; Nagano, Kunitoshi ; Fujita, Kazuo ; Kuroshima, Hika ; Hasegawa, Toshikazu. / Advantage of dichromats over trichromats in discrimination of color-camouflaged stimuli in nonhuman primates. In: American Journal of Primatology. 2005 ; Vol. 67, No. 4. pp. 425-436.
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