Aeromagnetic and aerial photographic survey in the South Shetland Islands, Antarctica, conducted by a small unmanned aerial vehicle (Ant-Plane)

Minoru Funaki, Shin-Ichiro Higashino, Shinya Sakanaka, Naoyoshi Iwata, Norihiro Nakamura, Naohiko Hirasawa, Noriaki Obara, Mikio Kuwabara

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Two small unmanned aerial vehicles, Ant-Plane 6 and Ant-Plane 3, were assembled using parts and technologies developed for model airplanes. The aerial vehicles were scheduled to conduct aero magnetic and photographic surveys of the Bransfield Basin, from a takeoff runway at Marsh Airfield on the South Shetland Islands, Antarctica, during January 2011. However, the scheduled surveys were not conducted on account of poor weather. Research was later conducted on a glacier, using a takeoff runway at St. Kliment Ohridski Base, Livingston Island, during December 2011. A flight from St. Kliment Ohridski Base to Deception Island yielded satisfactory results; the total distance of 302.4 km was traversed in 3 h 7 min (3;07). On this flight, aeromagnetic and aerial photographic data were obtained from an altitude of 780 m for a 9 ×18 km area on the northern half of Deception Island. Aerial photographs of Deception Island and South Bay showed the distributions of glaciers and their crevasses. The Ant-Plane flew over the Antarctic horizon and surveyed above Deception Island. That was the successful venture of this kind, demonstrating that airborne surveys by Ant-Planes are useful for Antarctic research investigations. Airborne surveys provide a safe and economical approach to data acquisition as compared with manned aerial operations.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)209-241
Number of pages33
JournalAntarctic Record
Volume57
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - Jul 1 2013

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aerial survey
Antarctica
ant
Formicidae
glaciers
airborne survey
flight
airplanes
glacier
crevasse
photographs
marshes
aerial photograph
data acquisition
weather
vehicle
unmanned aerial vehicles
marsh
basins
basin

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Aquatic Science
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)

Cite this

Aeromagnetic and aerial photographic survey in the South Shetland Islands, Antarctica, conducted by a small unmanned aerial vehicle (Ant-Plane). / Funaki, Minoru; Higashino, Shin-Ichiro; Sakanaka, Shinya; Iwata, Naoyoshi; Nakamura, Norihiro; Hirasawa, Naohiko; Obara, Noriaki; Kuwabara, Mikio.

In: Antarctic Record, Vol. 57, No. 2, 01.07.2013, p. 209-241.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Funaki, M, Higashino, S-I, Sakanaka, S, Iwata, N, Nakamura, N, Hirasawa, N, Obara, N & Kuwabara, M 2013, 'Aeromagnetic and aerial photographic survey in the South Shetland Islands, Antarctica, conducted by a small unmanned aerial vehicle (Ant-Plane)', Antarctic Record, vol. 57, no. 2, pp. 209-241.
Funaki, Minoru ; Higashino, Shin-Ichiro ; Sakanaka, Shinya ; Iwata, Naoyoshi ; Nakamura, Norihiro ; Hirasawa, Naohiko ; Obara, Noriaki ; Kuwabara, Mikio. / Aeromagnetic and aerial photographic survey in the South Shetland Islands, Antarctica, conducted by a small unmanned aerial vehicle (Ant-Plane). In: Antarctic Record. 2013 ; Vol. 57, No. 2. pp. 209-241.
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