Aggressive behavior and serum testosterone concentration during the maturation process of male mice: The effects of fetal exposure to bisphenol A

Keisuke Kawai, Takehiro Nozaki, Hiroaki Nishikata, Shuji Aou, Masato Takii, Chiharu Kubo

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Abstract

The relationship between exposure to endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDs) and risk to reprodictive organs is well documented, but the influence of EDs on behavioral development has not been studied. In this study we evaluated the effect of fetal exposure to bisphenol A, which mimics estrogenic activity, on aggressive behavior and hormonal change in male mice. On gestation days 11-17, female mice were fed bisphenol A at 2 ng/g or 20 ng/g of body weight (environmentally relevant concentration). Aggression rating and blood sampling of the offspring were done at 8, 12 and 16 weeks of age. Aggression scores increased significantly (p < 0.01) at 8 weeks of age in male mice exposed to bisphenol A at both the 2 ng/g and 20 ng/g concentrations compared with a control group, but not difference was found after 12 weeks. Relative testis weight (per gram of body weight) was significantly lower at 8 and 12 weeks in mice treated with 2 ng/g than in controls (p < 0.05) and was significantly lower at 12 weeks in mice treated with 20 ng/g than in controls (p < 0.01). The serum testosterone concentration in treated mice was not significantly different from that in controls. These results demonstrate that bisphenol A temporarily activated aggressive behavior in mice at 8 weeks of age and that low doses of bisphenol A interfered with the normal development a reproductive organs. The mechanism activating this aggressive behavior was not elevated testosterone concentration.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)175-178
Number of pages4
JournalEnvironmental Health Perspectives
Volume111
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - Feb 1 2003

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Testosterone
Serum
Aggression
Body Weight
Endocrine Disruptors
bisphenol A
Testis
Weights and Measures
Pregnancy
Control Groups

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

Cite this

Aggressive behavior and serum testosterone concentration during the maturation process of male mice : The effects of fetal exposure to bisphenol A. / Kawai, Keisuke; Nozaki, Takehiro; Nishikata, Hiroaki; Aou, Shuji; Takii, Masato; Kubo, Chiharu.

In: Environmental Health Perspectives, Vol. 111, No. 2, 01.02.2003, p. 175-178.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kawai, Keisuke ; Nozaki, Takehiro ; Nishikata, Hiroaki ; Aou, Shuji ; Takii, Masato ; Kubo, Chiharu. / Aggressive behavior and serum testosterone concentration during the maturation process of male mice : The effects of fetal exposure to bisphenol A. In: Environmental Health Perspectives. 2003 ; Vol. 111, No. 2. pp. 175-178.
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