Agreement between Parents and Teachers on Behavioral/Emotional Problems in Japanese School Children Using the Child Behavior Checklist

Hiroyuki Satake, Keiko Yoshida, Hiroshi Yamashita, Naoko Kinukawa, Tatsuya Takagishi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We investigated the agreement between Japanese parents' and teachers' ratings concerning their children's behavioral/emotional problems. Mothers (n = 276) and teachers (n = 19) assessed each child (n = 316; 6 to 12 years old) using Japanese parent and teacher version of the Child Behavior Checklist. Parent-teacher agreement were examined through three indices; mean scores, correlations and D scores (generalized distance between item profile). Mean scores rated by parents were significantly higher than those by teachers. The differences of parents' ratings according to sex of the child or parents' occupational level, and those of teachers' ratings according to sex of the child were consistent with previous Western studies. Parent-teacher correlations were in the low to middle range (0.16-0.36). We obtained significant sets of independent variables accounting for the variance of D scores, but the effect size of these variables was small. These results indicated that, as seen in Western studies, Japanese parents and teachers would also assess their child's problems differently and the child's demographics affect their evaluation. For further research, parent and teacher characteristics which may influence on their perspective of the child's problems could be examined.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)111-126
Number of pages16
JournalChild Psychiatry and Human Development
Volume34
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2003

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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