Alleviation of metabolic syndrome with dietary egg white protein

Bungo Shirouchi, Ryosuke Matsuoka

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Abdominal fat accumulation causes metabolic syndrome, which is a cluster of metabolic abnormalities such as dyslipidemia, glucose intolerance, insulin resistance or hyperinsulinemia, and hypertension, leading to the development of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Diets are known to contribute to the development or prevention of metabolic syndrome. Several studies have reported that the quality of dietary proteins may be an important modulator of the risk of this syndrome. We investigated the effects of consuming egg white protein (EWP) or lactic-fermented egg white (LE), an easy-to-consume form of egg white, on the development of metabolic syndrome in animal models and humans. In comparison with casein, dietary EWP decreased lymphatic lipid transport in thoracic lymph duct-cannulated rats. In an in vitro experiment, EWP pepsin hydrolysate decreased the cholesterol micellar solubility and cholesterol transfer rate from micelles to oil phase, and increased water-holding capacity, settling volume in water, and relative viscosity compared with casein pepsin hydrolysate. The daily consumption of LE for 8 weeks reduced serum total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol levels in men with mild hypercholesterolemia. Furthermore, dietary EWP reduced the body fat mass of rats by increasing the body protein mass and accelerating hepatic β-oxidation. The daily consumption of LE for 12 weeks reduced the visceral fat area and improved the ratio of the visceral to subcutaneous fat area. Taken together, these results indicated that dietary EWP and LE would be useful for preventing or alleviating metabolic syndrome.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)517-524
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of oleo science
Volume68
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Egg Proteins
Proteins
Cholesterol
Fats
Oils and fats
Pepsin A
Caseins
Casein
Rats
Dietary Proteins
Water
Micelles
Nutrition
Medical problems
LDL Cholesterol
Ducts
Modulators
Oils
Animals
Insulin

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Chemical Engineering(all)

Cite this

Alleviation of metabolic syndrome with dietary egg white protein. / Shirouchi, Bungo; Matsuoka, Ryosuke.

In: Journal of oleo science, Vol. 68, No. 6, 01.01.2019, p. 517-524.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

@article{8af840e2534549cbab593ea276cd0fdd,
title = "Alleviation of metabolic syndrome with dietary egg white protein",
abstract = "Abdominal fat accumulation causes metabolic syndrome, which is a cluster of metabolic abnormalities such as dyslipidemia, glucose intolerance, insulin resistance or hyperinsulinemia, and hypertension, leading to the development of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Diets are known to contribute to the development or prevention of metabolic syndrome. Several studies have reported that the quality of dietary proteins may be an important modulator of the risk of this syndrome. We investigated the effects of consuming egg white protein (EWP) or lactic-fermented egg white (LE), an easy-to-consume form of egg white, on the development of metabolic syndrome in animal models and humans. In comparison with casein, dietary EWP decreased lymphatic lipid transport in thoracic lymph duct-cannulated rats. In an in vitro experiment, EWP pepsin hydrolysate decreased the cholesterol micellar solubility and cholesterol transfer rate from micelles to oil phase, and increased water-holding capacity, settling volume in water, and relative viscosity compared with casein pepsin hydrolysate. The daily consumption of LE for 8 weeks reduced serum total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol levels in men with mild hypercholesterolemia. Furthermore, dietary EWP reduced the body fat mass of rats by increasing the body protein mass and accelerating hepatic β-oxidation. The daily consumption of LE for 12 weeks reduced the visceral fat area and improved the ratio of the visceral to subcutaneous fat area. Taken together, these results indicated that dietary EWP and LE would be useful for preventing or alleviating metabolic syndrome.",
author = "Bungo Shirouchi and Ryosuke Matsuoka",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.5650/jos.ess19084",
language = "English",
volume = "68",
pages = "517--524",
journal = "Journal of Oleo Science",
issn = "1345-8957",
publisher = "Japan Oil Chemists Society",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Alleviation of metabolic syndrome with dietary egg white protein

AU - Shirouchi, Bungo

AU - Matsuoka, Ryosuke

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Abdominal fat accumulation causes metabolic syndrome, which is a cluster of metabolic abnormalities such as dyslipidemia, glucose intolerance, insulin resistance or hyperinsulinemia, and hypertension, leading to the development of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Diets are known to contribute to the development or prevention of metabolic syndrome. Several studies have reported that the quality of dietary proteins may be an important modulator of the risk of this syndrome. We investigated the effects of consuming egg white protein (EWP) or lactic-fermented egg white (LE), an easy-to-consume form of egg white, on the development of metabolic syndrome in animal models and humans. In comparison with casein, dietary EWP decreased lymphatic lipid transport in thoracic lymph duct-cannulated rats. In an in vitro experiment, EWP pepsin hydrolysate decreased the cholesterol micellar solubility and cholesterol transfer rate from micelles to oil phase, and increased water-holding capacity, settling volume in water, and relative viscosity compared with casein pepsin hydrolysate. The daily consumption of LE for 8 weeks reduced serum total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol levels in men with mild hypercholesterolemia. Furthermore, dietary EWP reduced the body fat mass of rats by increasing the body protein mass and accelerating hepatic β-oxidation. The daily consumption of LE for 12 weeks reduced the visceral fat area and improved the ratio of the visceral to subcutaneous fat area. Taken together, these results indicated that dietary EWP and LE would be useful for preventing or alleviating metabolic syndrome.

AB - Abdominal fat accumulation causes metabolic syndrome, which is a cluster of metabolic abnormalities such as dyslipidemia, glucose intolerance, insulin resistance or hyperinsulinemia, and hypertension, leading to the development of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Diets are known to contribute to the development or prevention of metabolic syndrome. Several studies have reported that the quality of dietary proteins may be an important modulator of the risk of this syndrome. We investigated the effects of consuming egg white protein (EWP) or lactic-fermented egg white (LE), an easy-to-consume form of egg white, on the development of metabolic syndrome in animal models and humans. In comparison with casein, dietary EWP decreased lymphatic lipid transport in thoracic lymph duct-cannulated rats. In an in vitro experiment, EWP pepsin hydrolysate decreased the cholesterol micellar solubility and cholesterol transfer rate from micelles to oil phase, and increased water-holding capacity, settling volume in water, and relative viscosity compared with casein pepsin hydrolysate. The daily consumption of LE for 8 weeks reduced serum total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol levels in men with mild hypercholesterolemia. Furthermore, dietary EWP reduced the body fat mass of rats by increasing the body protein mass and accelerating hepatic β-oxidation. The daily consumption of LE for 12 weeks reduced the visceral fat area and improved the ratio of the visceral to subcutaneous fat area. Taken together, these results indicated that dietary EWP and LE would be useful for preventing or alleviating metabolic syndrome.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85067455496&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85067455496&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.5650/jos.ess19084

DO - 10.5650/jos.ess19084

M3 - Review article

C2 - 31168041

AN - SCOPUS:85067455496

VL - 68

SP - 517

EP - 524

JO - Journal of Oleo Science

JF - Journal of Oleo Science

SN - 1345-8957

IS - 6

ER -