Alterations of Ca2+ mobilizing properties in migrating endothelial cells

C. Kimura, Masahiro Oike, T. Koyama, Y. Ito

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34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Endothelial migration is one of the major events of pathological neovascularization. We compared the characteristics of Ca2+ mobilization in nonconfluent, confluent, and migrating endothelial cells. Migration of endothelial cells was induced by wounding the confluent cell monolayer. The basal intracellular Ca2+ concentration was lower in migrating cells and higher in confluent cells than in nonconfluent cells. Thapsigargin (TG)-induced Ca2+ leak and TG-evoked Ca2+ entry were accelerated in migrating cells, whereas the latter was suppressed in confluent cells. The ATP-induced Ca2+ transient was also much larger inmigrating cells than in confluent cells. These alterations were also observed in a cell as an intracellular polarization, i.e., the leading edge showed an acceleration of TG-evoked Ca2+ entry and an augmentation of the ATP-induced Ca2+ transient. Endothelial migration was significantly suppressed by TG or cyclopiazonic acid. These observations suggest that the alterations of Ca2+ store site-related Ca2+ mobilizations, i.e, Ca2+ sequestration, release, and TG-evoked Ca2+ entry, may be involved in the cellular mechanisms of endothelial migration.

Original languageEnglish
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Heart and Circulatory Physiology
Volume281
Issue number2 50-2
Publication statusPublished - Aug 29 2001

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Endothelial Cells
Thapsigargin
Adenosine Triphosphate
Pathologic Neovascularization

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physiology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Alterations of Ca2+ mobilizing properties in migrating endothelial cells. / Kimura, C.; Oike, Masahiro; Koyama, T.; Ito, Y.

In: American Journal of Physiology - Heart and Circulatory Physiology, Vol. 281, No. 2 50-2, 29.08.2001.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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