Altered soleus responses to magnetic stimulation in pure cerebellar ataxia

Tomomi Kurokawa-Kuroda, Katsuya Ogata, Rie Suga, Yoshinobu Goto, Takayuki Taniwaki, Jun-Ichi Kira, Shozo Tobimatsu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) over the leg motor area elicits a soleus primary response (SPR) and a soleus late response (SLR). We evaluated the influence of the cerebellofugal pathway on the SPR and SLR in patients with 'pure' cerebellar ataxia. Methods: SPRs and SLRs were recorded from 11 healthy subjects and 9 patients with 'pure' cerebellar cortical degeneration; 5 with spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6), and 4 with late cortical cerebellar ataxia (LCCA). In addition, three patients with localized cerebellar lesions were tested. Results: The SPR latency was significantly longer in patients than in controls, but primary responses in the tibialis anterior muscle were normal. The frequency of abnormal SLR was 38.9% in the supine position and 83.3% in the standing position. Two out of three patients with localized cerebellar lesions also showed abnormal SLR. Conclusions: Altered SPRs in patients may result from a dysfunction of the primary motor cortex caused by crossed cerebello-cerebral diaschisis. In addition, our results suggest that 'pure' cerebellar degeneration involves the mechanism responsible for evoking SLR which is related to the control of posture. Significance: SLR can be a useful neurophysiological parameter for evaluating cerebellofugal function.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1198-1203
Number of pages6
JournalClinical Neurophysiology
Volume118
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 1 2007

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Cerebellar Ataxia
Spinocerebellar Ataxias
Motor Cortex
Posture
Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation
Supine Position
Reaction Time
Leg
Healthy Volunteers
Muscles

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Sensory Systems
  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Physiology (medical)

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Altered soleus responses to magnetic stimulation in pure cerebellar ataxia. / Kurokawa-Kuroda, Tomomi; Ogata, Katsuya; Suga, Rie; Goto, Yoshinobu; Taniwaki, Takayuki; Kira, Jun-Ichi; Tobimatsu, Shozo.

In: Clinical Neurophysiology, Vol. 118, No. 6, 01.06.2007, p. 1198-1203.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kurokawa-Kuroda, Tomomi ; Ogata, Katsuya ; Suga, Rie ; Goto, Yoshinobu ; Taniwaki, Takayuki ; Kira, Jun-Ichi ; Tobimatsu, Shozo. / Altered soleus responses to magnetic stimulation in pure cerebellar ataxia. In: Clinical Neurophysiology. 2007 ; Vol. 118, No. 6. pp. 1198-1203.
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