Ambulance dispatches from unaffected areas after the Great East Japan Earthquake

Impact on emergency care in the unaffected areas

Akihito Hagihara, Daisuke Onozuka, Takashi Nagata, Takeru Abe, Manabu Hasegawa, Yoshihiro Nabeshima

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective Although dispatching ambulance crews from unaffected areas to a disaster zone is inevitable when a major disaster occurs, the effect on emergency care in the unaffected areas has not been studied. We evaluated whether dispatching ambulance crews from unaffected prefectures to those damaged by the Great East Japan Earthquake was associated with reduced resuscitation outcomes in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) cases in the unaffected areas. Methods We used the Box-Jenkins transfer function model to assess the relationship between ambulance crew dispatches and return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) before hospital arrival or 1-month survival after the cardiac event. Results In a model whose output was the rate of ROSC before hospital arrival, dispatching 1000 ambulance crews was associated with a 0.474% decrease in the rate of ROSC after the dispatch in the prefectures (p=0.023). In a model whose output was the rate of 1-month survival, dispatching 1000 ambulance crews was associated with a 0.502% decrease in the rate of 1-month survival after the dispatch in the prefectures (p=0.011). Conclusions The dispatch of ambulances from unaffected prefectures to earthquake-stricken areas was associated with a subsequent decrease in the ROSC and 1-month survival rates in OHCA cases in the unaffected prefectures.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)609-613
Number of pages5
JournalDisaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness
Volume9
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 5 2015

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Earthquakes
Ambulances
Emergency Medical Services
Japan
Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest
Disasters
Resuscitation

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Ambulance dispatches from unaffected areas after the Great East Japan Earthquake : Impact on emergency care in the unaffected areas. / Hagihara, Akihito; Onozuka, Daisuke; Nagata, Takashi; Abe, Takeru; Hasegawa, Manabu; Nabeshima, Yoshihiro.

In: Disaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness, Vol. 9, No. 6, 05.06.2015, p. 609-613.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hagihara, Akihito ; Onozuka, Daisuke ; Nagata, Takashi ; Abe, Takeru ; Hasegawa, Manabu ; Nabeshima, Yoshihiro. / Ambulance dispatches from unaffected areas after the Great East Japan Earthquake : Impact on emergency care in the unaffected areas. In: Disaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness. 2015 ; Vol. 9, No. 6. pp. 609-613.
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