American collegiate men's ice hockey: An analysis of injuries

Kyle Flik, Stephen Lyman, Robert G. Marx

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

162 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Reported rates and types of ice hockey injuries have been variable. Ice hockey combines tremendous speeds with aggressive physical play and therefore has great inherent potential for injury. Purpose: To identify rates and determinants of injury in American men's collegiate ice hockey. Study Design: Prospective cohort study. Methods: Data were collected from 8 teams in a Division I athletic conference for 1 season using an injury reporting form specific for ice hockey. Results: There were a total of 113 injuries in 23 096 athlete exposures. Sixty-five percent of injuries occurred during games, although games accounted for only 23% of all exposures. The overall injury rate was 4.9 per 1000 athlete exposures (13.8 per 1000 game athlete exposures and 2.2 per 1000 practice athlete exposures). Collision with an opponent (32.8%) or the boards (18.6%) caused more than half of all injuries. Concussion (18.6%) was the most common injury, followed by knee medial collateral ligament sprains, acromioclavicular joint injuries, and ankle sprains. Conclusions: The risk of injury in men's collegiate ice hockey is much greater during games than during practices. Concussions are a main cause for time lost and remain an area of major concern.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)183-187
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Sports Medicine
Volume33
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 1 2005
Externally publishedYes

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Hockey
Wounds and Injuries
Athletes
Knee Medial Collateral Ligament
Acromioclavicular Joint
Sprains and Strains
Ankle Injuries
Sports
Cohort Studies

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

American collegiate men's ice hockey : An analysis of injuries. / Flik, Kyle; Lyman, Stephen; Marx, Robert G.

In: American Journal of Sports Medicine, Vol. 33, No. 2, 01.02.2005, p. 183-187.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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