American exceptionalism? Similarities and differences in national attitudes toward energy policy and global warming

D. M. Reiner, T. E. Curry, M. A. De Figueiredo, H. J. Herzog, S. D. Ansolabehere, Kenshi Itaoka, F. Johnsson, M. Odenberger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

93 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Despite sharp differences in government policy, the views of the U.S. public on energy and global warming are remarkably similar to those in Sweden, Britain, and Japan. Americans do exhibit some differences, placing lower priority on the environment and global warming, and with fewer believing that "global warming has been established as a serious problem and immediate action is necessary". There also remains a small hard core of skeptics (<10%) who do not believe in the science of climate change and the need for action, a group that is much smaller in the other countries surveyed. The similarities are, however, pervasive. Similar preferences are manifest across a wide range of technology and fuel choices, in support of renewables, in research priorities, in a basic understanding of which technologies produce or reduce carbon dioxide (or misunderstandings in the case of nuclear power), and in willingness to pay for solving global warming.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2093-2098
Number of pages6
JournalEnvironmental Science and Technology
Volume40
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 1 2006

Fingerprint

Energy policy
Global warming
energy policy
global warming
nuclear power
willingness to pay
Carbon Dioxide
Climate change
Nuclear energy
carbon dioxide
climate change
energy

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Environmental Chemistry

Cite this

Reiner, D. M., Curry, T. E., De Figueiredo, M. A., Herzog, H. J., Ansolabehere, S. D., Itaoka, K., ... Odenberger, M. (2006). American exceptionalism? Similarities and differences in national attitudes toward energy policy and global warming. Environmental Science and Technology, 40(7), 2093-2098. https://doi.org/10.1021/es052010b

American exceptionalism? Similarities and differences in national attitudes toward energy policy and global warming. / Reiner, D. M.; Curry, T. E.; De Figueiredo, M. A.; Herzog, H. J.; Ansolabehere, S. D.; Itaoka, Kenshi; Johnsson, F.; Odenberger, M.

In: Environmental Science and Technology, Vol. 40, No. 7, 01.04.2006, p. 2093-2098.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Reiner, DM, Curry, TE, De Figueiredo, MA, Herzog, HJ, Ansolabehere, SD, Itaoka, K, Johnsson, F & Odenberger, M 2006, 'American exceptionalism? Similarities and differences in national attitudes toward energy policy and global warming', Environmental Science and Technology, vol. 40, no. 7, pp. 2093-2098. https://doi.org/10.1021/es052010b
Reiner, D. M. ; Curry, T. E. ; De Figueiredo, M. A. ; Herzog, H. J. ; Ansolabehere, S. D. ; Itaoka, Kenshi ; Johnsson, F. ; Odenberger, M. / American exceptionalism? Similarities and differences in national attitudes toward energy policy and global warming. In: Environmental Science and Technology. 2006 ; Vol. 40, No. 7. pp. 2093-2098.
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