An age-period-cohort analysis of biomarkers of lifestyle-related diseases using the national health and nutrition survey in Japan, 1973–2018

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Abstract

Studies of biomarkers of lifestyle-related diseases in Japanese cohorts are scarce. This study aimed to analyze trends in risk markers of lifestyle-related diseases using age-period-cohort (APC) analysis. Data on systolic blood pressure and BMI from 1973 to 2018 and serum glucose, triglyceride, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels from 1989 to 2018 available from the National Health and Nutrition Survey were used. Values for each of the risk markers for each age, period, and cohort were estimated using APC analysis. For women, a decrease in all the risk markers of lifestyle-related diseases was observed in individuals born between the 1930s and approximately 1970. Therefore, female individuals born in approximately 1970 were considered to have the lowest risk of developing lifestyle-related and cardiovascular diseases. Meanwhile, the cohort effect on all the risk markers deteriorated for the younger cohorts, and changes in lifestyle behavior are needed for cohorts born more recently. For men, the trends in risk markers across the cohorts differed, and the relative risk of lifestyle-related diseases for each cohort differed according to disease. These results could help understand cohort-specific risks for lifestyle-related disease and enable identification of high-risk populations who could benefit from preventive measures.

Original languageEnglish
Article number8159
Pages (from-to)1-13
Number of pages13
JournalInternational journal of environmental research and public health
Volume17
Issue number21
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 1 2020

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

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