An ERP Study of Causative Cleft Construction in Japanese

Evidence for the Preference of Shorter Linear Distance in Sentence Comprehension

Masataka Yano, Tsutomu Sakamoto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study examined the processing of two types of Japanese causative cleft constructions (subject-gap vs. object-gap) by conducting an event-related brain potential experiment to clarify the processing mechanism of long-distance dependencies. The results demonstrated that the subject-gap constructions elicited larger P600 effects than the object-gap constructions. Based on these findings, we argue that the linear distance rather than the structural distance between the extracted argument (filler) and its original gap position is a crucial factor for determining processing costs of gap-filler dependency in Japanese causative cleft constructions. This argument indicates that (at least) some types of long-distance dependencies are sensitive to linear distance.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)407-421
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Psycholinguistic Research
Volume45
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 1 2016

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comprehension
evidence
Evoked Potentials
Costs and Cost Analysis
brain
Brain
Dependency (Psychology)
Sentence Comprehension
Causative
Cleft Constructions
event
experiment
costs
Long-distance Dependencies
Event-related Brain Potentials
Costs
Experiment
Filler-gap Dependencies
Conducting
Fillers

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Language and Linguistics
  • Linguistics and Language
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

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