An exceptionally well-preserved Eocene dolichopodid fly eye: Function and evolutionary significance

Gengo Tanaka, Andrew R. Parker, David J. Siveter, Haruyoshi Maeda, Masumi Furutani

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The exceptionally preserved eyes of an Eocene dolichopodid fly contained in Baltic amber show remarkable detail, including features at micrometre and submicrometre levels. Based on this material, we establish that it is likely that the neural superposition compound eye existed as far back as 45Ma. The ommatidia have an open rhabdom with a trapezoidal arrangement of seven rhabdomeres. Such a structure is uniquely characteristic of the neural superposition compound eye of present-day flies. Optical analysis reveals that the fossil eyes had a sophisticated and efficient optical system.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1015-1019
Number of pages5
JournalProceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
Volume276
Issue number1659
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 22 2009

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Amber
compound eyes
Diptera
Optical systems
Eocene
eyes
ommatidia
amber
fossils
Optical Devices
fossil

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)
  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

An exceptionally well-preserved Eocene dolichopodid fly eye : Function and evolutionary significance. / Tanaka, Gengo; Parker, Andrew R.; Siveter, David J.; Maeda, Haruyoshi; Furutani, Masumi.

In: Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, Vol. 276, No. 1659, 22.03.2009, p. 1015-1019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tanaka, Gengo ; Parker, Andrew R. ; Siveter, David J. ; Maeda, Haruyoshi ; Furutani, Masumi. / An exceptionally well-preserved Eocene dolichopodid fly eye : Function and evolutionary significance. In: Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences. 2009 ; Vol. 276, No. 1659. pp. 1015-1019.
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