An in vitro system for infection with hepatitis B virus that uses primary human fetal hepatocytes

T. Ochiya, T. Tsurimoto, K. Ueda, K. Okubo, M. Shiozawa, K. Matsubara

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

70 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

An in vitro culture of human fetal hepatocytes has been employed for infection by hepatitis B virus (HBV) virions that are produced by an established human hepatoma cell line, HB 611. HBV surface antigen and e antigen were released into the medium 3-4 days after infection, and production continued thereafter. RNA synthesis with similar kinetics was observed. Viral DNA replication started 2 days after infection, and replicative HBV DNA that included relaxed circles, single-stranded minus strands, and closed circles accumulated during 16 days of incubation. Immunofluorescent study using fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled rabbit antisera directed against HBV core antigen revealed that this antigen is present in the nuclei in 12% of the infected cells. Particles containing HBV DNA were detected in the culture medium and were infectious. Thus, this in vitro infection system closely mimics infection in vivo and it allows detailed studies on early events associated with human HBV entry into cells and subsequent replication and integration.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1875-1879
Number of pages5
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume86
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 1989
Externally publishedYes

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Hepatitis B virus
Hepatocytes
Infection
Hepatitis B Core Antigens
Virus Internalization
Hepatitis B e Antigens
DNA
Viral DNA
Hepatitis B Surface Antigens
Fluorescein
DNA Replication
Virion
Culture Media
In Vitro Techniques
Immune Sera
Hepatocellular Carcinoma
RNA
Rabbits
Antigens
Cell Line

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • General

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An in vitro system for infection with hepatitis B virus that uses primary human fetal hepatocytes. / Ochiya, T.; Tsurimoto, T.; Ueda, K.; Okubo, K.; Shiozawa, M.; Matsubara, K.

In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, Vol. 86, No. 6, 01.01.1989, p. 1875-1879.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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