An operated case of bitemporal lobe epilepsy associated with old infarction in the left occipital lobe

T. Kawamura, T. Morioka, S. Nishio, K. Mizokami, M. Sasaki, K. Ishii, M. Fukui

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

A 15-year-old female, who presented with bitemporal lobe epilepsy associated with old infarction in the left occipital lobe, was reported. MRI with fluid attenuated inversion recovery sequence demonstrates cortical atrophy with hyperintensity of the white matter in the left occipital lobe as well as volume loss and hyperintensity of the left hippocampus. Interictal positron emission tomography with [1SF] fluorodeoxy glucose (FDG-PET) and single photon emission computed tomography with technetium-99m-ethyl-cysteinate dimer indicate hypometabolism and hypoperfusion in the left occipital lobe and the left temporal lobe, respectively. Scalp recorded EEG did not lateralize the side of the epileptogenic zone. Chronic subdural electrode recording demonstrated that the ictal onset zones were located in the bilateral side of the temporal lobe. Eighty-nine percent of 19 spontaneous seizures were left sided onset. The anterior temporal lobectomy with hippocampectomy was performed for the left side. Although temporal lobe epilepsy is sometimes a bilateral disease, unilateral lobectomy for a strong predominant side, based on the MRI and FDG-PET findings, is effective for some patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)73-77
Number of pages5
JournalBrain and Nerve
Volume53
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 2001

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuroscience(all)

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    Kawamura, T., Morioka, T., Nishio, S., Mizokami, K., Sasaki, M., Ishii, K., & Fukui, M. (2001). An operated case of bitemporal lobe epilepsy associated with old infarction in the left occipital lobe. Brain and Nerve, 53(1), 73-77.