An ultrasound-driven needle-insertion robot for percutaneous cholecystostomy

J. Hong, T. Dohi, Makoto Hashizume, K. Konishi, N. Hata

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

119 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A real-time ultrasound-guided needle-insertion medical robot for percutaneous cholecystostomy has been developed. Image-guided interventions have become widely accepted because they are consistent with minimal invasiveness. However, organ or abnormality displacement due to involuntary patient motion may undesirably affect the intervention. The proposed instrument uses intraoperative images and modifies the needle path in real time by using a novel ultrasonic image segmentation technique. In phantom and volunteer experiments, the needle path updating time was 130 and 301 ms per cycle, respectively. In animal experiments, the needle could be placed accurately in the target.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)441-455
Number of pages15
JournalPhysics in Medicine and Biology
Volume49
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 7 2004

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Cholecystostomy
Needles
Ultrasonics
Volunteers

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

An ultrasound-driven needle-insertion robot for percutaneous cholecystostomy. / Hong, J.; Dohi, T.; Hashizume, Makoto; Konishi, K.; Hata, N.

In: Physics in Medicine and Biology, Vol. 49, No. 3, 07.02.2004, p. 441-455.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hong, J. ; Dohi, T. ; Hashizume, Makoto ; Konishi, K. ; Hata, N. / An ultrasound-driven needle-insertion robot for percutaneous cholecystostomy. In: Physics in Medicine and Biology. 2004 ; Vol. 49, No. 3. pp. 441-455.
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