Analysis of gender-based differences among surgeons in Japan: results of a survey conducted by the Japan Surgical Society. Part 1: Working style

Kazumi Kawase, Kyoko Nomura, Ryuji Tominaga, Hirotaka Iwase, Tomoko Ogawa, Ikuko Shibasaki, Mitsuo Shimada, Tomoaki Taguchi, Emiko Takeshita, Yasuko Tomizawa, Sachiyo Nomura, Kazuhiro Hanazaki, Tomoko Hanashi, Hiroko Yamashita, Norihiro Kokudo, Kotaro Maeda

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To assess the working styles of men and women working as surgeons in Japan. Methods: In July, 2014, the Japan Surgical Society invited all their members (n = 29,861), through an internet campaign, to participate in a nationwide survey of surgeons. The items investigated in this descriptive study included demographic information and working styles, based on a questionnaire. Results: In total, 6211 surgeons participated (response rate 20.8%, 5586 men and 625 women). The largest age stratum was 40–49 years for men and 30–39 years for women. Overall, respondents identified their labor contract, including salary and work hours, as the highest priority for improvement. Women with children were more likely to be part-time employees, work fewer hours, and take fewer house calls/on-calls than their male counterparts. Moreover, women of all ages earned a lower annual income than men, irrespective of whether they had children. Perception scores for discrimination related to work and promotion were significantly higher among women than men (p < 0.01 and p = 0.011, respectively). Conclusions: A significant difference in working style was observed between men and women working as surgeons in Japan.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)33-43
Number of pages11
JournalSurgery today
Volume48
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2018

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Japan
Working Women
House Calls
Salaries and Fringe Benefits
Contracts
Internet
Surgeons
Surveys and Questionnaires
Demography

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery

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Analysis of gender-based differences among surgeons in Japan : results of a survey conducted by the Japan Surgical Society. Part 1: Working style. / Kawase, Kazumi; Nomura, Kyoko; Tominaga, Ryuji; Iwase, Hirotaka; Ogawa, Tomoko; Shibasaki, Ikuko; Shimada, Mitsuo; Taguchi, Tomoaki; Takeshita, Emiko; Tomizawa, Yasuko; Nomura, Sachiyo; Hanazaki, Kazuhiro; Hanashi, Tomoko; Yamashita, Hiroko; Kokudo, Norihiro; Maeda, Kotaro.

In: Surgery today, Vol. 48, No. 1, 01.01.2018, p. 33-43.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kawase, K, Nomura, K, Tominaga, R, Iwase, H, Ogawa, T, Shibasaki, I, Shimada, M, Taguchi, T, Takeshita, E, Tomizawa, Y, Nomura, S, Hanazaki, K, Hanashi, T, Yamashita, H, Kokudo, N & Maeda, K 2018, 'Analysis of gender-based differences among surgeons in Japan: results of a survey conducted by the Japan Surgical Society. Part 1: Working style', Surgery today, vol. 48, no. 1, pp. 33-43. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00595-017-1556-0
Kawase, Kazumi ; Nomura, Kyoko ; Tominaga, Ryuji ; Iwase, Hirotaka ; Ogawa, Tomoko ; Shibasaki, Ikuko ; Shimada, Mitsuo ; Taguchi, Tomoaki ; Takeshita, Emiko ; Tomizawa, Yasuko ; Nomura, Sachiyo ; Hanazaki, Kazuhiro ; Hanashi, Tomoko ; Yamashita, Hiroko ; Kokudo, Norihiro ; Maeda, Kotaro. / Analysis of gender-based differences among surgeons in Japan : results of a survey conducted by the Japan Surgical Society. Part 1: Working style. In: Surgery today. 2018 ; Vol. 48, No. 1. pp. 33-43.
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