Analysis of gender-based differences among surgeons in Japan: results of a survey conducted by the Japan Surgical Society. Part. 2: personal life

Kazumi Kawase, Kyoko Nomura, Ryuji Tominaga, Hirotaka Iwase, Tomoko Ogawa, Ikuko Shibasaki, Mitsuo Shimada, Tomoaki Taguchi, Emiko Takeshita, Yasuko Tomizawa, Sachiyo Nomura, Kazuhiro Hanazaki, Tomoko Hanashi, Hiroko Yamashita, Norihiro Kokudo, Kotaro Maeda

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To assess the true conditions and perceptions of the personal lives of men and women working as surgeons in Japan. Methods: In 2014, all e-mail subscribed members of the Japan Surgical Society (JSS, n = 29,861) were invited to complete a web-based survey. The questions covered demographic information, work environment, and personal life (including marital status, childcare, and nursing care for adult family members). Results: In total, 6211 surgeons (5586 men and 625 women) returned the questionnaires, representing a response rate of 20.8%. Based on the questionnaire responses, surgeons generally prioritize work and spend most of their time at work, although women with children prioritize their family over work; men spend significantly fewer hours on domestic work/childcare than do their female counterparts (men 0.76 h/day vs. women 2.93 h/day, p < 0.01); and both men and women surgeons, regardless of their age or whether they have children, place more importance on the role of women in the family. Conclusions: The personal lives of Japanese surgeons differed significantly according to gender and whether they have children. The conservative idea that women should bear primary responsibility for the family still pertains for both men and women working as surgeons in Japan.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)308-319
Number of pages12
JournalSurgery today
Volume48
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 1 2018

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Japan
Working Women
Marital Status
Postal Service
Nursing Care
Surgeons
Surveys and Questionnaires
Demography

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery

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Analysis of gender-based differences among surgeons in Japan : results of a survey conducted by the Japan Surgical Society. Part. 2: personal life. / Kawase, Kazumi; Nomura, Kyoko; Tominaga, Ryuji; Iwase, Hirotaka; Ogawa, Tomoko; Shibasaki, Ikuko; Shimada, Mitsuo; Taguchi, Tomoaki; Takeshita, Emiko; Tomizawa, Yasuko; Nomura, Sachiyo; Hanazaki, Kazuhiro; Hanashi, Tomoko; Yamashita, Hiroko; Kokudo, Norihiro; Maeda, Kotaro.

In: Surgery today, Vol. 48, No. 3, 01.03.2018, p. 308-319.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kawase, K, Nomura, K, Tominaga, R, Iwase, H, Ogawa, T, Shibasaki, I, Shimada, M, Taguchi, T, Takeshita, E, Tomizawa, Y, Nomura, S, Hanazaki, K, Hanashi, T, Yamashita, H, Kokudo, N & Maeda, K 2018, 'Analysis of gender-based differences among surgeons in Japan: results of a survey conducted by the Japan Surgical Society. Part. 2: personal life', Surgery today, vol. 48, no. 3, pp. 308-319. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00595-017-1586-7
Kawase, Kazumi ; Nomura, Kyoko ; Tominaga, Ryuji ; Iwase, Hirotaka ; Ogawa, Tomoko ; Shibasaki, Ikuko ; Shimada, Mitsuo ; Taguchi, Tomoaki ; Takeshita, Emiko ; Tomizawa, Yasuko ; Nomura, Sachiyo ; Hanazaki, Kazuhiro ; Hanashi, Tomoko ; Yamashita, Hiroko ; Kokudo, Norihiro ; Maeda, Kotaro. / Analysis of gender-based differences among surgeons in Japan : results of a survey conducted by the Japan Surgical Society. Part. 2: personal life. In: Surgery today. 2018 ; Vol. 48, No. 3. pp. 308-319.
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AU - Shibasaki, Ikuko

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AU - Nomura, Sachiyo

AU - Hanazaki, Kazuhiro

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AU - Kokudo, Norihiro

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