Anesthetic Management Using Low Fraction of Inspiratory Oxygen for Living Donor Liver Transplantation in a Patient With Hepatopulmonary Syndrome Complicated by Interstitial Pneumonia: A Case Report

Keita Takahashi, Kazuya Imura, Keiko Nobukuni, Shoichi Sasaki, Taichi Nagano, Noboru Harada, Tomoharu Yoshizumi, Midoriko Higashi, Ken Yamaura

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Hepatopulmonary syndrome frequently complicates end-stage liver disease. It causes hypoxemia and requires oxygen administration. Additionally, interstitial pneumonia causes hypoxemia; however, it is known to be aggravated by high-concentration oxygen administration.

CASE PRESENTATION: A 71-year-old woman with hepatopulmonary syndrome and interstitial pneumonia underwent living donor liver transplantation, requiring conflicting management in terms of the inspiratory oxygen concentration. We achieved a low intraoperative fraction of inspiratory oxygen by increasing the cardiac output with intravenous catecholamines. As a result, the transplanted liver functioned well postoperatively, and the patient was discharged without exacerbation of the interstitial pneumonia.

CONCLUSION: We suggest that patients with hepatopulmonary syndrome complicated with interstitial pneumonia can undergo successful living donor liver transplantation without the use of high inspiratory oxygen concentration by using catecholamines to maintain a high mixed venous oxygen saturation.

Original languageEnglish
JournalTransplantation Proceedings
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - Aug 28 2021

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