Anti-monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 gene therapy inhibits restenotic changes (neointimal hyperplasia) after balloon injury in rats and monkeys.

Makoto Usui, Kensuke Egashira, kisho ohtani, Chu Kataoka, Minako Ishibashi, Hiasa Ken-Ichi, Makoto Katoh, Qingwei Zhao, Shiro Kitamoto, Akira Takeshita

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Abstract

Prevention of restenosis after coronary intervention is a major clinical challenge, which highlights the need of new therapeutic options. Vascular injury may involve inflammatory responses that accelerate the recruitment and activation of monocytes through the activation of chemotactic factors, including monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1). However, there is no definitive evidence supporting the role of MCP-1 in restenosis. We recently devised a new strategy for anti-MCP-1 gene therapy by transfecting an N-terminal deletion mutant of the MCP-1 gene into skeletal muscles. We demonstrate here that this strategy suppressed monocyte infiltration/activation in the injured site and markedly inhibited restenotic changes (neointimal hyperplasia) after balloon injury of the carotid artery in rats and monkeys. This strategy also suppressed the local production of MCP-1 and inflammatory cytokines. Therefore, monocyte infiltration and activation mediated by MCP-1 are essential in the development of restenotic changes after balloon injury. This strategy may be a useful form of gene therapy against human restenosis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1838-1840
Number of pages3
JournalThe FASEB journal : official publication of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology
Volume16
Issue number13
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2002

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Gene therapy
Chemokine CCL2
Balloons
Genetic Therapy
Hyperplasia
Haplorhini
Rats
Wounds and Injuries
Chemical activation
Monocytes
Infiltration
Carotid Artery Injuries
Coronary Restenosis
Vascular System Injuries
Chemotactic Factors
Muscle
Skeletal Muscle
Genes
Cytokines

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biotechnology
  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics

Cite this

Anti-monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 gene therapy inhibits restenotic changes (neointimal hyperplasia) after balloon injury in rats and monkeys. / Usui, Makoto; Egashira, Kensuke; ohtani, kisho; Kataoka, Chu; Ishibashi, Minako; Ken-Ichi, Hiasa; Katoh, Makoto; Zhao, Qingwei; Kitamoto, Shiro; Takeshita, Akira.

In: The FASEB journal : official publication of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology, Vol. 16, No. 13, 01.01.2002, p. 1838-1840.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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