Anxiety and poor social support are independently associated with adverse outcomes in patients with mild heart failure

Miyuki Tsuchihashi-Makaya, Norihiro Kato, Akiko Chishaki, Akira Takeshita, Hiroyuki Tsutsui

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Abstract

Background The impact of psychosocial states, such as depression or anxiety, and social support on the outcomes of stable outpatients with mild heart failure (HF) has not been evaluated in the "real world" clinical practice. Methods and Results In the present study, 139 patients with a prior history of admission for HF provided the baseline demographic, clinical, socio-environmental, and psychosocial information. Cardiac death or re-admission because of worsening of HF was monitored during the follow-up period of 1 year. The prevalence of depression and anxiety were 37% and 37%, respectively, in HF patients. Depression was independently associated with male (sβ=-0.36, P=0.01), social ties (sβ=0.22, P=0.04) and low social support (sβ=-0.39, P<0.01). Anxiety was associated with alcohol drinking (sβ=0.22, P=0.04), brain natriuretic peptide ≥200 pg/dl (s/=0.35, P<0.01), and low social support (sβ=-0.28, P=0.01). Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated that patients with anxiety (log-lank test; P<0.01) and lower scores of social support (P<0.01) had a higher rate of HF-related re-admission. Conclusions Anxiety and low social support were independently associated with HF-related re-admission, which indicates the need for their inclusion in the assessment and management of HF.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)280-287
Number of pages8
JournalCirculation Journal
Volume73
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 10 2009

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Social Support
Anxiety
Heart Failure
Depression
Brain Natriuretic Peptide
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Alcohol Drinking
Outpatients
Demography

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Anxiety and poor social support are independently associated with adverse outcomes in patients with mild heart failure. / Tsuchihashi-Makaya, Miyuki; Kato, Norihiro; Chishaki, Akiko; Takeshita, Akira; Tsutsui, Hiroyuki.

In: Circulation Journal, Vol. 73, No. 2, 10.02.2009, p. 280-287.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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