[Application of multiple-attribute utility technology (MAUT) to decisions about a work-site stress-control intervention for public-sector office workers].

Akihito Hagihara, Kimio Tarumi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The reasons behind the establishment of particular health-promotion programs in community or work settings are often unclear, and such programs are rarely evaluated from a broad perspective after they are implemented. Thus, multiattribute utility technology (MAUT) was used to design a work-site stress-control program. The sample consisted of public-sector workers in B City in Japan. Stakeholders in the work-site stress-control program included employers (municipal authorities), employees (public workers), and healthcare personnel. Six goals and three strategies (i.e., personnel, self-care, and staff) related to stress-control programs were considered. The results showed that the self-care strategy received the highest score for overall utility (i.e., 96.2), and the overall-utility score for the remaining two strategies was approximately 70. The self-care strategy emerged as the most useful of the three strategies for developing a stress-control program in a target work place. The application of MAUT may be useful for developing an effective stress-control program in occupational settings.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)72-77
Number of pages6
JournalNihon eiseigaku zasshi. Japanese journal of hygiene
Volume68
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

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