Arachidonic acid supplementation during gestational, lactational and post-weaning periods prevents retinal degeneration induced in a rodent model

Katsuhiko Yoshizawa, Tomo Sasaki, Maki Kuro, Norihisa Uehara, Hideho Takada, Akiko Harauma, Naoki Ohara, Toru Moriguchi, Airo Tsubura

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Fatty acids and their derivatives play a role in the response to retinal injury. The effects of dietary arachidonic acid (AA) supplementation on N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU)-induced retinal degeneration was investigated in young Lewis rats during the gestational, lactational and post-weaning periods. Dams were fed 0·1, 0·5 or 2·0 % AA diets or a basal ( < 0·01 % AA) diet. On postnatal day 21 (at weaning), male pups received a single intraperitoneal injection of 50 mg MNU/kg or vehicle, and were fed the same diet as their mother for 7 d. Retinal apoptosis was analysed by the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP digoxigenin nick-end labelling (TUNEL) assay 24 h after the MNU treatment, and retinal morphology was examined 7 d post-MNU. Histologically, all rats that received MNU and were fed the basal and 0·1 % AA diets developed retinal degeneration characterised by the loss of photoreceptor cells (disappearance of the outer nuclear layer and the photoreceptor layer) in the central retina. The 0·5 and 2·0 % AA diets rescued rats from retinal damage. Morphometrically, in parallel with the AA dose (0·5 and 2·0 % AA), the photoreceptor ratio significantly increased and the retinal damage ratio decreased in the central retina, compared with the corresponding ratios in basal diet-fed rats. In parallel with the increase in serum and retinal AA levels and the AA:DHA ratio, the apoptotic index in the central retina was dose-dependently decreased in rats fed the 0·5 and 2·0 % AA diets. In conclusion, an AA-rich diet during the gestation, lactation and post-weaning periods rescued young Lewis rats from MNU-induced retinal degeneration via the inhibition of photoreceptor apoptosis. Therefore, an AA-enriched diet in the prenatal and postnatal periods may be an important strategy to suppress the degree of photoreceptor injury in humans.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1424-1432
Number of pages9
JournalBritish Journal of Nutrition
Volume109
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 1 2013
Externally publishedYes

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Retinal Degeneration
Weaning
Arachidonic Acid
Rodentia
Diet
Retina
Apoptosis
Methylnitrosourea
Digoxigenin
Photoreceptor Cells
DNA Nucleotidylexotransferase
Wounds and Injuries
Intraperitoneal Injections
Lactation
Fatty Acids

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Arachidonic acid supplementation during gestational, lactational and post-weaning periods prevents retinal degeneration induced in a rodent model. / Yoshizawa, Katsuhiko; Sasaki, Tomo; Kuro, Maki; Uehara, Norihisa; Takada, Hideho; Harauma, Akiko; Ohara, Naoki; Moriguchi, Toru; Tsubura, Airo.

In: British Journal of Nutrition, Vol. 109, No. 8, 01.04.2013, p. 1424-1432.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yoshizawa, Katsuhiko ; Sasaki, Tomo ; Kuro, Maki ; Uehara, Norihisa ; Takada, Hideho ; Harauma, Akiko ; Ohara, Naoki ; Moriguchi, Toru ; Tsubura, Airo. / Arachidonic acid supplementation during gestational, lactational and post-weaning periods prevents retinal degeneration induced in a rodent model. In: British Journal of Nutrition. 2013 ; Vol. 109, No. 8. pp. 1424-1432.
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