Are ceramic nanofilms a soft matter?

Junhui He, Toyoki Kunitake

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Conventional ceramic films (metal oxides, metal carbides and metal nitrides) are commonly known as hard materials. However, much evidence appears to show that the softness and hardness of ceramic films are dependent on the bonding interaction on the atomic and molecular scale as well as on the structures on the microscopic scale. When ceramic films become extremely thin, i.e., ceramic nanofilms, they are in fact a soft matter. In this paper, the authors discuss the conceivable factors that affect the softness and hardness of a material on different length scales, and review both their recent work and others' that present the evidence of the softness of metal oxide nanofilms and inorganic layered materials.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)119-125
Number of pages7
JournalSoft Matter
Volume2
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 10 2006

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softness
Metals
ceramics
Oxides
metal oxides
hardness
Hardness
metal nitrides
inorganic materials
Nitrides
carbides
nitrides
Carbides
metals
interactions

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Condensed Matter Physics

Cite this

Are ceramic nanofilms a soft matter? / He, Junhui; Kunitake, Toyoki.

In: Soft Matter, Vol. 2, No. 2, 10.04.2006, p. 119-125.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

He, J & Kunitake, T 2006, 'Are ceramic nanofilms a soft matter?', Soft Matter, vol. 2, no. 2, pp. 119-125. https://doi.org/10.1039/b514908h
He, Junhui ; Kunitake, Toyoki. / Are ceramic nanofilms a soft matter?. In: Soft Matter. 2006 ; Vol. 2, No. 2. pp. 119-125.
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