Are renewables as friendly to humans as to the environment? A social life cycle assessment of renewable electricity

Shutaro Takeda, Alexander Ryota Keeley, Shigeki Sakurai, Shunsuke Managi, Catherine Benoît Norris

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The adoption of renewable energy technologies in developing nations is recognized to have positive environmental impacts; however, what are their effects on the electricity supply chain workers? This article provides a quantitative analysis on this question through a relatively new framework called social life cycle assessment, taking Malaysia as a case example. Impact assessments by the authors show that electricity from renewables has greater adverse impacts on supply chain workers than the conventional electricity mix: Electricity production with biomass requires 127% longer labor hours per unit-electricity under the risk of human rights violations, while the solar photovoltaic requires 95% longer labor hours per unit-electricity. However, our assessment also indicates that renewables have less impacts per dollar-spent. In fact, the impact of solar photovoltaic would be 60% less than the conventional mix when it attains grid parity. The answer of "are renewables as friendly to humans as to the environment?" is "not-yet, but eventually".

Original languageEnglish
Article number1370
JournalSustainability (Switzerland)
Volume11
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 1 2019

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Renewable Energy, Sustainability and the Environment
  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law

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