Arterial blood gas levels and cardiovascular function during varying environmental conditions in a mudskipper, Periophthalmodon schlosseri

Atsushi Ishimatsu, Nancy M. Aguilar, Kougi Ogawa, Yasuhiro Hishida, Tatsusuke Takeda, Shin Oikawa, Takeshi Kanda, Khoo Khay Huat

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Changes in blood gas levels, blood pressure and heart rate were studied in chronically cannulated mudskippers, Periophthalmodon schlosseri, subjected to air exposure (6 h), aquatic hypoxia with access to air (water PO2 <0.9 kPa, 6 h) and forced submersion in normoxic water (12 h) at 30°C. Air exposure did not affect either blood O2 and had little effect on blood CO2 levels, but blood pH increased slightly, but significantly. Blood ammonia concentration was elevated sixfold during air exposure. Aquatic hypoxia caused no significant changes in blood gas levels. When the fish was forcibly submerged, blood O2 saturation decreased rapidly to approximately 30%. Blood PCO2 and total CO2 also decreased, but blood pH was unaffected by forcible submersion. Air exposure did not affect blood pressure or heart rate. Aquatic hypoxia did not affect blood pressure but transiently increased heart rate. In contrast, forced submersion significantly depressed heart rate throughout the period of submersion, while blood pressure decreased only transiently. Upon emersion, the heart rate immediately increased to above the control level when the fish took its first air breath.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1753-1762
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Experimental Biology
Volume202
Issue number13
Publication statusPublished - Jul 1999

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Physiology
  • Aquatic Science
  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Molecular Biology
  • Insect Science

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