Assessment of nutrients removal by constructed wetlands using reed grass (Phragmites australis L.) and vetiver grass (Vetiveria Zizanioides L.)

Nguyen Minh Ky, Nguyen Tri Quang Hung, Nguyen Cong Manh, Bui Quoc Lap, Huyen Thi Thanh Dang, Akinori Ozaki

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    4 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Constructed wetland (CW) has been considered one of the low cost and effective wastewater treatment technologies for application in Vietnam. This paper attempted to evaluate the nutrient absorption ability of reed grass (Phragmites australis L.) and vetiver grass (Vetiveria Zizanioides L.) utilized in the vertical flow constructed wetland systems. Different hydraulic loading rates of 500 ml/min/m2, 1000 ml/min/m2and 1500 ml/min/m2were tried. The results showed that the nutrient removal percentage was highest at the hydraulic loading rate of 500 ml/min/m2. There was no statistically significant difference in nutrient removal between reed grass and vetiver at the same loading rate (p>0.05). Nevertheless, at the same loading level, the nutrient removal of the wetlands with plants was always higher than those without the plants (p<0.05). The effluent from the vertical constructed wetlands using plants all met the National technical regulation of surface water quality for agricultural irrigation purposes (column B1 in QCVN 08-MT: 2015/BTNMT). Thus, the constructed wetland using reed grass and vetiver grass would be quite a promising low cost technology for treatment of wastewater for irrigation purpose.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)149-156
    Number of pages8
    JournalJournal of the Faculty of Agriculture, Kyushu University
    Volume65
    Issue number1
    Publication statusPublished - 2020

    All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

    • Biotechnology
    • Agronomy and Crop Science

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