Association between Epstein-Barr virus serological reactivation and psychological distress: a cross-sectional study of Japanese community-dwelling older adults

Hirotomo Yamanashi, Shogo Akabame, Jun Miyata, Yukiko Honda, Fumiaki Nonaka, Yuji Shimizu, Seiko Nakamichi, Shin Ya Kawashiri, Mami Tamai, Kazuhiko Arima, Atsushi Kawakami, Kiyoshi Aoyagi, Takahiro Maeda

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Reactivation of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is associated with the etiopathogenesis of a broad spectrum of diseases. This study aimed to investigate the association between psychological distress and EBV serological reactivation among community-dwelling older people and assess the role of sex differences in this association. This population-based cross-sectional survey was conducted among individuals who underwent annual health checkups (N = 2,821; median age 72.4 years). EBV serological reactivation was defined as elevation of EBV early antigen immunoglobulin G titers, and psychological distress was defined as Kessler 6 scores ≥5. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed to calculate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for EBV serological reactivation and psychological distress. EBV serological reactivation and psychological distress were detected in 16.4% and 8.7% of participants, respectively. Women accounted for 71% (328/463) of those with EBV serological reactivation. Multivariable logistic regression analysis showed psychological distress was not significantly associated with EBV serological reactivation among all participants (OR 1.31, 95% CI: 0.95, 1.82; P = 0.102). A sex-stratified multivariable analysis showed a positive association among women (OR 1.45, 95% CI: 1.01, 2.08; P = 0.043), but no association among men. EBV serological reactivation was independently associated with psychological distress in community-dwelling older women. The sex difference in our results warrants further investigation to clarify the physiological mechanisms underlying the association.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)8258-8269
Number of pages12
JournalAging
Volume14
Issue number20
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2022
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ageing
  • Cell Biology

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