Association of body mass index with blood pressure in 80-year-old subjects

Kiyoshi Matsumura, Toshihiro Ansai, Shuji Awano, Tomoko Hamasaki, Sumio Akifusa, Tadamichi Takehara, Isao Abe, Yutaka Takata

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Little data are available on the association between obesity and high blood pressure in elderly individuals, particularly in subjects over 80 years of age. The aim of the present study was to determine the association between body mass index (BMI) and blood pressure in 80-year-old subjects. Methods: This study was part of the 8020 Data Bank Survey, which was designed to collect the baseline data of systemic and dental health conditions in 80-year-old subjects. We studied the cross-sectional association of BMI with blood pressures in 645 Japanese (258 men and 387 women), who were 80 years old. Results: Mean systolic blood pressure rose from 146.6 mmHg in the first quintile of BMI to 147.5 mmHg in the second, 150.3 mmHg in the third, 151.6 mmHg in the fourth, and 156.4 mmHg in the fifth quintiles (test for trend, P=0.006). Mean diastolic blood pressure rose from 75.8 mmHg in the lowest quintile of BMI to 81.8 mmHg in the highest (test for trend, P=0.002). We performed multiple regression analysis, controlling for factors known to influence blood pressure values, such as sex, alcohol intake, current smoking status and serum glucose, total cholesterol and creatinine concentrations. The association between BMI and systolic and diastolic blood pressure, respectively, was highly statistically significant in all analyses. Conclusion: These results show that a close relationship is present between obesity and high blood pressure, even in very old subjects.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2165-2169
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Hypertension
Volume19
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 24 2001

Fingerprint

Body Mass Index
Blood Pressure
Obesity
Hypertension
Creatinine
Tooth
Smoking
Cholesterol
Regression Analysis
Alcohols
Databases
Glucose
Health
Serum

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Internal Medicine
  • Physiology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Matsumura, K., Ansai, T., Awano, S., Hamasaki, T., Akifusa, S., Takehara, T., ... Takata, Y. (2001). Association of body mass index with blood pressure in 80-year-old subjects. Journal of Hypertension, 19(12), 2165-2169. https://doi.org/10.1097/00004872-200112000-00008

Association of body mass index with blood pressure in 80-year-old subjects. / Matsumura, Kiyoshi; Ansai, Toshihiro; Awano, Shuji; Hamasaki, Tomoko; Akifusa, Sumio; Takehara, Tadamichi; Abe, Isao; Takata, Yutaka.

In: Journal of Hypertension, Vol. 19, No. 12, 24.12.2001, p. 2165-2169.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Matsumura, K, Ansai, T, Awano, S, Hamasaki, T, Akifusa, S, Takehara, T, Abe, I & Takata, Y 2001, 'Association of body mass index with blood pressure in 80-year-old subjects', Journal of Hypertension, vol. 19, no. 12, pp. 2165-2169. https://doi.org/10.1097/00004872-200112000-00008
Matsumura K, Ansai T, Awano S, Hamasaki T, Akifusa S, Takehara T et al. Association of body mass index with blood pressure in 80-year-old subjects. Journal of Hypertension. 2001 Dec 24;19(12):2165-2169. https://doi.org/10.1097/00004872-200112000-00008
Matsumura, Kiyoshi ; Ansai, Toshihiro ; Awano, Shuji ; Hamasaki, Tomoko ; Akifusa, Sumio ; Takehara, Tadamichi ; Abe, Isao ; Takata, Yutaka. / Association of body mass index with blood pressure in 80-year-old subjects. In: Journal of Hypertension. 2001 ; Vol. 19, No. 12. pp. 2165-2169.
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