Association of sarcopenic obesity predicted by anthropometric measurements and 24-y all-cause mortality in elderly men: The Kuakini Honolulu Heart Program

Kiyoshi Sanada, Randi Chen, Bradley Willcox, Tomoyuki Ohara, Aida Wen, Cody Takenaka, Kamal Masaki

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Abstract

Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the association between anthropometric measurements of sarcopenic obesity and all-cause mortality. Methods The study included 2309 Japanese-American men ages 71 to 93 y. Mortality data were available for up to 24 y of follow-up. Sarcopenic obesity defined by three patterns of obesity indexes (body mass index [BMI], percent body fat [%BF] and waist circumference [WC]) and skeletal muscle index estimated by anthropometric measurements. Results Of the 2309 participants, 2210 deaths were reported during the mean follow-up period of 11.7 y. Risk for death was significantly increased with sarcopenia after adjusting for baseline age, lifestyle variables, hypertension, diabetes, and cognitive scores (hazard ratio [HR], 1.26; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.15–1.38). Risk for death was significantly decreased with obesity using WC and %BF to define obesity, but not BMI. Risk for death also was significantly increased in the sarcopenia group compared with the optimal group, regardless of which pattern of obesity indexes (BMI, %BF, and WC) was used. Risk for death was significantly increased in sarcopenic obesity defined by WC (HR, 1.19; 95% CI, 1.02–1.38), borderline in the BMI-defined group, and not significant in the %BF-defined group. Conclusion All-cause mortality was increased in men with sarcopenic obesity defined by WC, but not BMI and %BF. Sarcopenia was a stronger predictor of all-cause mortality in this cohort >70 y of age. These results suggest that anthropometric definitions for sarcopenia and sarcopenic obesity are clinically useful as a predictor of all-cause mortality.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)97-102
Number of pages6
JournalNutrition
Volume46
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 1 2018

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Obesity
Sarcopenia
Waist Circumference
Mortality
Body Mass Index
Confidence Intervals
Asian Americans
Adipose Tissue
Life Style
Skeletal Muscle
Hypertension

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Association of sarcopenic obesity predicted by anthropometric measurements and 24-y all-cause mortality in elderly men : The Kuakini Honolulu Heart Program. / Sanada, Kiyoshi; Chen, Randi; Willcox, Bradley; Ohara, Tomoyuki; Wen, Aida; Takenaka, Cody; Masaki, Kamal.

In: Nutrition, Vol. 46, 01.02.2018, p. 97-102.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sanada, Kiyoshi ; Chen, Randi ; Willcox, Bradley ; Ohara, Tomoyuki ; Wen, Aida ; Takenaka, Cody ; Masaki, Kamal. / Association of sarcopenic obesity predicted by anthropometric measurements and 24-y all-cause mortality in elderly men : The Kuakini Honolulu Heart Program. In: Nutrition. 2018 ; Vol. 46. pp. 97-102.
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title = "Association of sarcopenic obesity predicted by anthropometric measurements and 24-y all-cause mortality in elderly men: The Kuakini Honolulu Heart Program",
abstract = "Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the association between anthropometric measurements of sarcopenic obesity and all-cause mortality. Methods The study included 2309 Japanese-American men ages 71 to 93 y. Mortality data were available for up to 24 y of follow-up. Sarcopenic obesity defined by three patterns of obesity indexes (body mass index [BMI], percent body fat [{\%}BF] and waist circumference [WC]) and skeletal muscle index estimated by anthropometric measurements. Results Of the 2309 participants, 2210 deaths were reported during the mean follow-up period of 11.7 y. Risk for death was significantly increased with sarcopenia after adjusting for baseline age, lifestyle variables, hypertension, diabetes, and cognitive scores (hazard ratio [HR], 1.26; 95{\%} confidence interval [CI], 1.15–1.38). Risk for death was significantly decreased with obesity using WC and {\%}BF to define obesity, but not BMI. Risk for death also was significantly increased in the sarcopenia group compared with the optimal group, regardless of which pattern of obesity indexes (BMI, {\%}BF, and WC) was used. Risk for death was significantly increased in sarcopenic obesity defined by WC (HR, 1.19; 95{\%} CI, 1.02–1.38), borderline in the BMI-defined group, and not significant in the {\%}BF-defined group. Conclusion All-cause mortality was increased in men with sarcopenic obesity defined by WC, but not BMI and {\%}BF. Sarcopenia was a stronger predictor of all-cause mortality in this cohort >70 y of age. These results suggest that anthropometric definitions for sarcopenia and sarcopenic obesity are clinically useful as a predictor of all-cause mortality.",
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AU - Ohara, Tomoyuki

AU - Wen, Aida

AU - Takenaka, Cody

AU - Masaki, Kamal

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N2 - Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the association between anthropometric measurements of sarcopenic obesity and all-cause mortality. Methods The study included 2309 Japanese-American men ages 71 to 93 y. Mortality data were available for up to 24 y of follow-up. Sarcopenic obesity defined by three patterns of obesity indexes (body mass index [BMI], percent body fat [%BF] and waist circumference [WC]) and skeletal muscle index estimated by anthropometric measurements. Results Of the 2309 participants, 2210 deaths were reported during the mean follow-up period of 11.7 y. Risk for death was significantly increased with sarcopenia after adjusting for baseline age, lifestyle variables, hypertension, diabetes, and cognitive scores (hazard ratio [HR], 1.26; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.15–1.38). Risk for death was significantly decreased with obesity using WC and %BF to define obesity, but not BMI. Risk for death also was significantly increased in the sarcopenia group compared with the optimal group, regardless of which pattern of obesity indexes (BMI, %BF, and WC) was used. Risk for death was significantly increased in sarcopenic obesity defined by WC (HR, 1.19; 95% CI, 1.02–1.38), borderline in the BMI-defined group, and not significant in the %BF-defined group. Conclusion All-cause mortality was increased in men with sarcopenic obesity defined by WC, but not BMI and %BF. Sarcopenia was a stronger predictor of all-cause mortality in this cohort >70 y of age. These results suggest that anthropometric definitions for sarcopenia and sarcopenic obesity are clinically useful as a predictor of all-cause mortality.

AB - Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the association between anthropometric measurements of sarcopenic obesity and all-cause mortality. Methods The study included 2309 Japanese-American men ages 71 to 93 y. Mortality data were available for up to 24 y of follow-up. Sarcopenic obesity defined by three patterns of obesity indexes (body mass index [BMI], percent body fat [%BF] and waist circumference [WC]) and skeletal muscle index estimated by anthropometric measurements. Results Of the 2309 participants, 2210 deaths were reported during the mean follow-up period of 11.7 y. Risk for death was significantly increased with sarcopenia after adjusting for baseline age, lifestyle variables, hypertension, diabetes, and cognitive scores (hazard ratio [HR], 1.26; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.15–1.38). Risk for death was significantly decreased with obesity using WC and %BF to define obesity, but not BMI. Risk for death also was significantly increased in the sarcopenia group compared with the optimal group, regardless of which pattern of obesity indexes (BMI, %BF, and WC) was used. Risk for death was significantly increased in sarcopenic obesity defined by WC (HR, 1.19; 95% CI, 1.02–1.38), borderline in the BMI-defined group, and not significant in the %BF-defined group. Conclusion All-cause mortality was increased in men with sarcopenic obesity defined by WC, but not BMI and %BF. Sarcopenia was a stronger predictor of all-cause mortality in this cohort >70 y of age. These results suggest that anthropometric definitions for sarcopenia and sarcopenic obesity are clinically useful as a predictor of all-cause mortality.

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