Association of skipping breakfast and short sleep duration with the prevalence of metabolic syndrome in the general Japanese population: Baseline data from the Japan Multi-Institutional Collaborative cohort study

for the Japan Multi-Institutional Collaborative Cohort J-MICC Study

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Abstract

The purpose of the study was to investigate sex-specific associations of skipping breakfast and short sleep duration with metabolic syndrome (MetS) and their interaction. We analyzed baseline data of 14,907 men and 14,873 women aged 35–69 years, who participated in the Japan Multi-Institutional Collaborative Cohort Study from 2005. MetS was diagnosed using a modification of the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III revised definition (NCEP-R 2005), using body mass index instead of waist circumference. Breakfast consumption was classified into two categories: ≥6 days/week (consumers) or <6 days/week (skippers). Sleep duration was classified into three categories: <6h, 6 to <8 h, and ≥8 h/day. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) and examine the presence of interaction. In men, skipping breakfast and short sleep duration were independently associated with an increased prevalence of MetS (OR 1.26, 95%CI 1.12–1.42 and OR 1.28, 95%CI 1.12–1.45, respectively), obesity, and components of MetS. However, no significant interaction was observed between skipping breakfast and short sleep duration. In women, skipping breakfast and short sleep duration were associated with an increased prevalence of obesity, but not with MetS. These findings indicate that breakfast consumption and moderate sleep duration may be associated with a lower risk of MetS, particularly in men.

Original languageEnglish
Article number101613
JournalPreventive Medicine Reports
Volume24
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2021
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health Informatics
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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