Attentional bias modification alters intrinsic functional network of attentional control: A randomized controlled trial

Yuko Hakamata, Shinya Mizukami, Shotaro Komi, Eisuke Sato, Yoshiya Moriguchi, Yuki motomura, Kazushi Maruo, Shuhei Izawa, Yoshiharu Kim, Takashi Hanakawa, Yusuke Inoue, Hirokuni Tagaya

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Introduction: Attentional bias modification (ABM) alleviates anxiety by moderating biased attentional processing toward threat; however, its neural mechanisms remain unclear. We examined how ABM changes functional connectivity (FC) and functional network measures, leading to anxiety reduction. Methods: Fifty-four healthy anxious individuals received either ABM or sham training for 1 month in a double-blind randomized controlled trial. Anxious traits, attentional control, and attentional bias were assessed. Thirty-five participants completed resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans before and after training. Results: ABM significantly mitigated an anxious traits regarding physical stress vulnerability (η2 = 0.12, p = 0.009). As compared to sham training, ABM significantly strengthened FC between the pulvinar and transverse gyrus along the temporoparietal junction (T = 3.90, FDR-corrected p = 0.010), whereas it decreased FC between the postCG and ventral fronto-parietal network (vFPN) regions such as the anterior insula and ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (all T ≤ − 3.19, FDR-corrected p ≤ 0.034). Although ABM diminished network measures of the postcentral gyrus (postCG) (all T ≤ − 4.30, FDR-corrected p ≤ 0.006), only the pulvinar-related FC increase was specifically correlated with anxiety reduction (r = − 0.46, p = 0.007). Limitations: Per-protocol analysis and reduced sample size in MRI analysis. Conclusions: ABM might augment the pulvinar's control over vFPN to maintain endogenous attention to a behavioral goal, while diminishing the information exchanges of the postCG with vFPN to inhibit the capture of exogenous attention by potential threats. The pulvinar might play a critical role in ABM anxiolytic efficacy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)472-481
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Affective Disorders
Volume238
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 1 2018

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Randomized Controlled Trials
Pulvinar
Somatosensory Cortex
Anxiety
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Attentional Bias
Parietal Lobe
Anti-Anxiety Agents
Prefrontal Cortex
Sample Size

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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Attentional bias modification alters intrinsic functional network of attentional control : A randomized controlled trial. / Hakamata, Yuko; Mizukami, Shinya; Komi, Shotaro; Sato, Eisuke; Moriguchi, Yoshiya; motomura, Yuki; Maruo, Kazushi; Izawa, Shuhei; Kim, Yoshiharu; Hanakawa, Takashi; Inoue, Yusuke; Tagaya, Hirokuni.

In: Journal of Affective Disorders, Vol. 238, 01.10.2018, p. 472-481.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hakamata, Y, Mizukami, S, Komi, S, Sato, E, Moriguchi, Y, motomura, Y, Maruo, K, Izawa, S, Kim, Y, Hanakawa, T, Inoue, Y & Tagaya, H 2018, 'Attentional bias modification alters intrinsic functional network of attentional control: A randomized controlled trial', Journal of Affective Disorders, vol. 238, pp. 472-481. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jad.2018.06.018
Hakamata, Yuko ; Mizukami, Shinya ; Komi, Shotaro ; Sato, Eisuke ; Moriguchi, Yoshiya ; motomura, Yuki ; Maruo, Kazushi ; Izawa, Shuhei ; Kim, Yoshiharu ; Hanakawa, Takashi ; Inoue, Yusuke ; Tagaya, Hirokuni. / Attentional bias modification alters intrinsic functional network of attentional control : A randomized controlled trial. In: Journal of Affective Disorders. 2018 ; Vol. 238. pp. 472-481.
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T1 - Attentional bias modification alters intrinsic functional network of attentional control

T2 - A randomized controlled trial

AU - Hakamata, Yuko

AU - Mizukami, Shinya

AU - Komi, Shotaro

AU - Sato, Eisuke

AU - Moriguchi, Yoshiya

AU - motomura, Yuki

AU - Maruo, Kazushi

AU - Izawa, Shuhei

AU - Kim, Yoshiharu

AU - Hanakawa, Takashi

AU - Inoue, Yusuke

AU - Tagaya, Hirokuni

PY - 2018/10/1

Y1 - 2018/10/1

N2 - Introduction: Attentional bias modification (ABM) alleviates anxiety by moderating biased attentional processing toward threat; however, its neural mechanisms remain unclear. We examined how ABM changes functional connectivity (FC) and functional network measures, leading to anxiety reduction. Methods: Fifty-four healthy anxious individuals received either ABM or sham training for 1 month in a double-blind randomized controlled trial. Anxious traits, attentional control, and attentional bias were assessed. Thirty-five participants completed resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans before and after training. Results: ABM significantly mitigated an anxious traits regarding physical stress vulnerability (η2 = 0.12, p = 0.009). As compared to sham training, ABM significantly strengthened FC between the pulvinar and transverse gyrus along the temporoparietal junction (T = 3.90, FDR-corrected p = 0.010), whereas it decreased FC between the postCG and ventral fronto-parietal network (vFPN) regions such as the anterior insula and ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (all T ≤ − 3.19, FDR-corrected p ≤ 0.034). Although ABM diminished network measures of the postcentral gyrus (postCG) (all T ≤ − 4.30, FDR-corrected p ≤ 0.006), only the pulvinar-related FC increase was specifically correlated with anxiety reduction (r = − 0.46, p = 0.007). Limitations: Per-protocol analysis and reduced sample size in MRI analysis. Conclusions: ABM might augment the pulvinar's control over vFPN to maintain endogenous attention to a behavioral goal, while diminishing the information exchanges of the postCG with vFPN to inhibit the capture of exogenous attention by potential threats. The pulvinar might play a critical role in ABM anxiolytic efficacy.

AB - Introduction: Attentional bias modification (ABM) alleviates anxiety by moderating biased attentional processing toward threat; however, its neural mechanisms remain unclear. We examined how ABM changes functional connectivity (FC) and functional network measures, leading to anxiety reduction. Methods: Fifty-four healthy anxious individuals received either ABM or sham training for 1 month in a double-blind randomized controlled trial. Anxious traits, attentional control, and attentional bias were assessed. Thirty-five participants completed resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans before and after training. Results: ABM significantly mitigated an anxious traits regarding physical stress vulnerability (η2 = 0.12, p = 0.009). As compared to sham training, ABM significantly strengthened FC between the pulvinar and transverse gyrus along the temporoparietal junction (T = 3.90, FDR-corrected p = 0.010), whereas it decreased FC between the postCG and ventral fronto-parietal network (vFPN) regions such as the anterior insula and ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (all T ≤ − 3.19, FDR-corrected p ≤ 0.034). Although ABM diminished network measures of the postcentral gyrus (postCG) (all T ≤ − 4.30, FDR-corrected p ≤ 0.006), only the pulvinar-related FC increase was specifically correlated with anxiety reduction (r = − 0.46, p = 0.007). Limitations: Per-protocol analysis and reduced sample size in MRI analysis. Conclusions: ABM might augment the pulvinar's control over vFPN to maintain endogenous attention to a behavioral goal, while diminishing the information exchanges of the postCG with vFPN to inhibit the capture of exogenous attention by potential threats. The pulvinar might play a critical role in ABM anxiolytic efficacy.

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