Autonomous bottom-up fabrication of three-dimensional nano/microcellulose honeycomb structures, directed by bacterial nanobuilder

Tetsuo Kondo, Wakako Kasai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We investigated the autonomous bottom-up fabrication of three-dimensional honeycomb cellulose structures, using Gluconacetobacter xylinus as a bacterial nanoengine, on cellulose honeycomb templates prepared by casting water-in-oil emulsions on glass substrates (Kasai and Kondo, Macromol. Biosci., 4, 17-21, 2004). The template film had a unique molecular orientation state along the honeycomb frames, but was non-crystalline. When G.xylinus, used as a nanofiber-producing bacterium, was incubated on the honeycomb scaffold in a culture medium, it secreted cellulose nanofibers only on the upper surface of the honeycomb frame. The movement was regulated by a selective interaction between the synthesized nanofiber and the surface of the honeycomb frames of the template. The relationship between directed deposition of synthesized nanofibers and ordered fabrication from the nano- to the micro-scale could provide a novel bottom-up methodology, using bacteria, for the design of three-dimensional honeycomb structures as functional materials with nano/micro hierarchical structures, with low energy consumption.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)482-487
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Bioscience and Bioengineering
Volume118
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 1 2014

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Nanofibers
Honeycomb structures
Bacterial Structures
Cellulose
Fabrication
Bacteria
Gluconacetobacter xylinus
Functional materials
Molecular orientation
Emulsions
Scaffolds
Glass
Culture Media
Oils
Casting
Energy utilization
Water
Substrates

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biotechnology
  • Bioengineering
  • Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology

Cite this

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abstract = "We investigated the autonomous bottom-up fabrication of three-dimensional honeycomb cellulose structures, using Gluconacetobacter xylinus as a bacterial nanoengine, on cellulose honeycomb templates prepared by casting water-in-oil emulsions on glass substrates (Kasai and Kondo, Macromol. Biosci., 4, 17-21, 2004). The template film had a unique molecular orientation state along the honeycomb frames, but was non-crystalline. When G.xylinus, used as a nanofiber-producing bacterium, was incubated on the honeycomb scaffold in a culture medium, it secreted cellulose nanofibers only on the upper surface of the honeycomb frame. The movement was regulated by a selective interaction between the synthesized nanofiber and the surface of the honeycomb frames of the template. The relationship between directed deposition of synthesized nanofibers and ordered fabrication from the nano- to the micro-scale could provide a novel bottom-up methodology, using bacteria, for the design of three-dimensional honeycomb structures as functional materials with nano/micro hierarchical structures, with low energy consumption.",
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