Behavioral and clinical correlates of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in Japanese men and women

Akie Hirata, Keizo Ohnaka, Makiko Morita, Kengo Toyomura, Suminori Kono, Ken Yamamoto, Masahiro Adachi, Hisaya Kawate, Ryoichi Takayanagi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Inflammation has been implicated in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes mellitus and cancer. Serum concentration of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein is a good biomarker of chronic low-grade inflammation. Few studies have evaluated relative importance of behavioral and clinical covariates of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in Japanese population. Methods: The study subjects were men and women aged 49-76 years from the cohort study of lifestyle-related diseases between February 2004 and July 2006. Analysis of covariance and multiple linear regression analysis were used to estimate geometric means of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and trends of association. Results: Smoking, body mass index, hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus, elevated non-high density lipoprotein cholesterol, prudent dietary pattern were independently associated with serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in both men and women. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein concentrations were lowest in men with a moderate intake of alcohol (< 30 mL/day). In men, smoking and body mass index accounted for 28 % and 26 % of the variation in high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, respectively, while body mass index accounted for 60 % of the variation of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in women. Conclusions: Smoking and body mass index in men, and body mass index in women, were major correlates of serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in Japanese people.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1469-1476
Number of pages8
JournalClinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine
Volume50
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 1 2012

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Biochemistry, medical

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