Behavioral and clinical correlates of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in Japanese men and women

Akie Hirata, Ohnaka Keizo, Makiko Morita, Kengo Toyomura, Suminori Kono, Ken Yamamoto, Masahiro Adachi, Hisaya Kawate, Ryoichi Takayanagi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Inflammation has been implicated in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes mellitus and cancer. Serum concentration of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein is a good biomarker of chronic low-grade inflammation. Few studies have evaluated relative importance of behavioral and clinical covariates of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in Japanese population. Methods: The study subjects were men and women aged 49-76 years from the cohort study of lifestyle-related diseases between February 2004 and July 2006. Analysis of covariance and multiple linear regression analysis were used to estimate geometric means of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and trends of association. Results: Smoking, body mass index, hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus, elevated non-high density lipoprotein cholesterol, prudent dietary pattern were independently associated with serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in both men and women. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein concentrations were lowest in men with a moderate intake of alcohol (< 30 mL/day). In men, smoking and body mass index accounted for 28 % and 26 % of the variation in high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, respectively, while body mass index accounted for 60 % of the variation of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in women. Conclusions: Smoking and body mass index in men, and body mass index in women, were major correlates of serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in Japanese people.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1469-1476
Number of pages8
JournalClinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine
Volume50
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 1 2012

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C-Reactive Protein
Body Mass Index
Smoking
Medical problems
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Serum
Inflammation
Biomarkers
Linear regression
Regression analysis
Life Style
Linear Models
Cohort Studies
Cardiovascular Diseases
Regression Analysis
Alcohols
Association reactions
Hypertension
Population
Neoplasms

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Biochemistry, medical

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Behavioral and clinical correlates of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in Japanese men and women. / Hirata, Akie; Keizo, Ohnaka; Morita, Makiko; Toyomura, Kengo; Kono, Suminori; Yamamoto, Ken; Adachi, Masahiro; Kawate, Hisaya; Takayanagi, Ryoichi.

In: Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine, Vol. 50, No. 8, 01.10.2012, p. 1469-1476.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hirata, A, Keizo, O, Morita, M, Toyomura, K, Kono, S, Yamamoto, K, Adachi, M, Kawate, H & Takayanagi, R 2012, 'Behavioral and clinical correlates of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in Japanese men and women', Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine, vol. 50, no. 8, pp. 1469-1476. https://doi.org/10.1515/cclm-2011-0839
Hirata, Akie ; Keizo, Ohnaka ; Morita, Makiko ; Toyomura, Kengo ; Kono, Suminori ; Yamamoto, Ken ; Adachi, Masahiro ; Kawate, Hisaya ; Takayanagi, Ryoichi. / Behavioral and clinical correlates of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in Japanese men and women. In: Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine. 2012 ; Vol. 50, No. 8. pp. 1469-1476.
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AU - Adachi, Masahiro

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